Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Peter Clifford from An Garda Síochána to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Peter Clifford

Probationer Garda

An Garda Síochána

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  Peter Clifford
To get physically fit for the entrance tests and also for the demanding physical nature of the job. Also I would tell people to enjoy themselves before they join as it’s a job for at least 30 years.

I would also informl people about the variety of avenues people can get into when they have completed their training. There really is a career for every person regardless of where their interests lie. There is so many specialised units and prospects.
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Investigative?
Investigative 
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Adult Learner

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Progression Routes


As an adult learner, you decide what education and training options best suit you. Whatever your situation, adult learning options are varied and designed to be enjoyable, relevant to what you are interested in and flexible to fit in with work and family life.

You can start of with short taster courses to try out different areas for example: computer courses, childcare courses, communications and so on. You can then build on these, progress and and gain more accrediation in these particular areas.

Understanding how students progress in Ireland through the PLC route can be a little tricky. It's worth noting that up to 20% of all applications to HEIs (Higher Education Institutes) come from the FET sector (Further Educaiton and Training) Approximately half of these applicants get a CAO offer. 

The important point is that FET courses carry accreditation through the Quality Qualifications Ireland (QQI) framework.

These progression opportunities are a real stepping stone for adult learners - in summary:

Any student with a full QQI Award at Level 5 (or 6) can use this certificate qualification to compete for a place in a Third Level College, if the college is one of the 38 HEIs that allow progression to a degree and beyond.

Progressing from one course to another: From FET (Levels 3-6) to HEI (Levels 6-10)

Below is a practical example of how a learner may progress from one level to the next. (The example relates to the Clondalkin/Tallaght area, but it applies to all learners).

Source: "RoadMap to Training and Education in the Clondalkin area"

The model above is a 'roadmap'. It shows the journey for a Learner who wants to pursue a qualification in Computer Science. The Learner starts with a basic level computer course in the local area, and progresses, in a series of stages, to a third level course in a university, and right up to a Doctorate:

  1. Level 3 course - General Learning with IT
  2. Level 4 course - Computer Information Technology
  3. Level 5 course - Computer Programming and Multimedia
  4. Level 6 course - Higher Certificate in Science in Information Technology
  5. Level 7- 8 course - Bachelor of Science in Computing
  6. Level 9 - Masters in Computer Science
  7. Level 10 - PHD in Computer Science
To begin your Learner journey, start by searching our PLC course databaseclick here  

Note: If the course that interests you offers progression pathways to level 6, 7 and 8 courses this green link   will appear beside the course title.

 

  Hint: STEPS

I am currently studying a part-time Masters in Image Processing in Dublin City University. This is to satisfy some extra training in an area I work in daily. Image processing is the study of using cameras to replicate human vision. We use them to inspect parts for defects.

Training is very much a big part of our company and it is encouraged that some form of training is completed annually. All relevant training is funded by the organisation. This is common in the engineering world. I am spending a week in Japan soon for further training in Image Processing with a Japanese Engineer


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