Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Brian Macken from Smart Futures to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Brian Macken

Science Communicator

Smart Futures

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  Brian Macken

I would strongly advise you to do the Masters in Science Communication in DCU. It really gives you a feel for the different kinds of media and ways of explaining things. And it's a good place to make contacts, which is also useful.

I would also recommend that you read science books. Not textbooks, good popular science books are just as useful for this kind of work, as it's already been broken down into simpler language for you. And only read the ones that you're interested in - it shouldn't be a chore to read them.

But I would recommend reading outside your subject area, so if you're into physics, then read some books on biology and vice versa (everyone should read Stephen J. Gould).  However, the more knowledge you have, the more questions you'll be able to answer.

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Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Adult Learner

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Part-Time Education Option


The Part-Time Education Option (PTEO) allows you to keep your Jobseeker’s Allowance or Jobseeker’s Benefit and attend a part-time day or evening course of education or training.

You must continue to meet the conditions for Jobseeker’s Benefit or Jobseeker’s Allowance. If you are offered work while on the course you will be expected to accept the job offer.

Note: The Part-Time Education Option is not the same as the Back to Education Allowance or the Education, Training and Development Option. (See menu [Left] for details of these initiatives).

There are no specific eligibility criteria for the PTEO. You can be any age and may be unemployed for any length of time before starting a part-time course of education.

The PTEO scheme does not involve any special payment or additional allowance.

For further information on PTEO click here
  Hint: ESB
Learning and Development is actively encouraged at the ESB. Currently, I am planning on doing a few one day courses this year to help broaden my knowledge on the new things I am learning at work. In the future, I may decide to do another diploma or degree.
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