Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Claire Hanrahan from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Claire Hanrahan

Auditor

CRH plc

Read more

  Claire Hanrahan

The candidate needs to have a desire to travel. That is the most important. Travel is a vital part of the role of Internal Auditor at CRH. Your travel percentage ranges between 40% - 70% per year. They do try to keep it at a minimum but with a high staff turnover, you could be placed on additional audits that are short staffed.

You need to get on with all the people you work with also as you're away with these people for 4 nights a week for 4 weeks. You need to be friendly and outgoing and easy to get along with as it can get stressful on jobs so the last thing you want is someone who has attitude problems or can't communicate properly! Those 2 aspects are the most important for me.

Close

Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
All Courses
PLC Progression Routes
PLC Points Calculator
CAO Points Calculator
CAO Video Guide

Ballsbridge College of Further Education 
Cork Institute of Technology - CIT 
Colaiste Ide College of Further Education 
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

Adult Learner

logo imagelogo image

Return to work supports


Often people worry about losing their social welfare benefits when they return to work. However, there are a number of supports and incentives available that can help you make this transition back into employment.

The Ready Reckoner is a user friendly tool for those in receipt of a jobseeker's payment. It gives an indication of the difference between your potential in-work and your current out-of-work payments based on information provided by you. The tool is anonymous and you are not required to enter your personal details.

To view this: click here

Jobseeker’s payments and part-time work

If you are unemployed and in receipt of either Jobseeker’s Benefit or Jobseeker’s Allowance you can accept an offer of part-time work and may be able to qualify for a Jobseeker’s Benefit or Jobseeker’s Allowance payment for the days that you are unemployed.
 
Working part-time is allowed, provided that you are:
  • unemployed for at least 4 days in any 7 consecutive days (including Sunday)
  • Genuinely Seeking full-time employment
  • available for work in respect of the remaining days of unemployment
Working for any part of a day, even only for one hour, is counted as a day of employment by the Department of Social Protection. You must advise the Department of any work you intend to undertake while receiving either Jobseeker’s Benefit or Jobseeker’s Allowance. If you are engaged in part-time employment you must be available for and genuinely seeking full-time employment to qualify for Jobseeker’s Benefit or Jobseeker’s Allowance. For more information: click here
The Part-Time Job Incentive (PTJI) Scheme, run by the Department of Social Protection, is intended as a stepping stone to full-time work. It allows certain long-term unemployed people to take up part-time work and get a special weekly allowance instead of their jobseeker’s payment. Recipients of the Part-Time Job Incentive Scheme must be available for and seeking full-time work while getting the payment.

For more information: click here

JobsPlus

JobsPlus is an incentive from the Department of Social Protection to encourage and reward employers who offer employment opportunities to the long term unemployed. Grants of €7,500 and €10,000 are available over two years for each eligible employee.

For more information: click here


The following are some Frequently Asked Questions about returning to work:

Q1. Can I retain my Medical Card?

People who have been unemployed for a minimum of 12 months may retain their Medical Card for a period of 3 years if they commence employment. The Medical Card scheme is administered by the Health Service Executive (HSE).

Q2. Are there any childcare supports available to help me make the transition to employment?

A subsidised after school childcare scheme is available to support low-income and unemployed people to return to the workforce. It is targeted at families that are most in need at a critical time in their progression into employment. By offsetting some of the child care costs associated with availing of an employment opportunity, the scheme aims to support individuals to take up employment.

Details of this scheme are available here.

The Department of Children and Youth Affairs also provide additional subsidised childcare supports. Details of these schemes are available on their website www.dcya.ie 

Q3. My income is still low, can I claim any financial support now that I am back in work?

FIS is a weekly tax-free payment available to employees with children which gives extra financial support to people on low pay. New employees under JobsPlus may be entitled to receive Family Income Supplement (FIS). JobsPlus is payable to the employer it does not prevent you from claiming FIS. If you are signing off the Live Register and meet the other conditions for FIS in terms of hours worked (at least 19 hours per week) etc. you may be eligible for FIS. 

To find out if you are eligible for FIS: click here

 

  Hint: ESB
It has to be said that ESBI give excellent training. Along with mandatory in-house training, where ESBI engineers bring you up to speed on all aspects of power plants and their design and operation ESBI also provide great opportunities for external training, e.g. I have been on a training course in Amsterdam to upskill on gasification technology, I attended a conference in Pittsburgh to come up to speed with CO2 capture technologies etc.
Who said this?
Find out here:
go