Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elaine MacDonald from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Elaine MacDonald

Psychologist - Clinical

St. Michael's House

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  Elaine MacDonald

Make sure you are willing to go the full distance in terms of the time needed to train as a Clinical Psychologist – it’s typically at least six years academic study, and invariably this period is interspersed with work in a relevant field.

Do be as confident as you can that you’re happy being a “listener” and “observer”, as you will spend significant amounts of time in your work life as a Clinical Psychologist being in this role, as well as being in the “do-er” role and being in the limelight.

To have a good ‘fit’ with this career you’ll need to be happy working with people – as individuals on a one to one basis, with groups (e.g. families), and as part of a team in the workplace.

You need to have a good attention to detail as the job needs good observation skills, record keeping, and organisation skills.

Be prepared for learning and self-development to be on-going for the whole of your career because, as a Clinical Psychologist, you’ll be learning and using techniques and intervention approaches that are being constantly developed, and be working in accordance with policies and laws that are also constantly evolving.

The last piece of advice I’d give to someone considering this job is to be as sure as you can that you feel comfortable and even excited at the prospect of your career revolving around people and groups with all the varied, diverse, and unpredictable rewards and challenges that this brings!

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Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Adult Learner

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Adult Guidance Services


Many people are unsure of where they should start when thinking about returning to education for personal development, to upskill or to get a job. There are services and supports available to help you with making these decisions:

Adult Educational Guidance Initiative

The Adult Education Guidance Service in Ireland is available to adults who are thinking about returning to education.

Guidance Counsellors and Co-ordinators provide guidance to those participating or thinking about adult education programmes such as Vocational Training Opportunity Scheme (VTOS), Adult Literacy Programmes, Community Education, including Back to Education Initiative (BTEI).

Information officers within the AEGS can also provide advice and information on local, regional an national opportunities for adult learners.

Adult Education Guidance Services in the Leinster region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Munster region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Connaght region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Ulster region

CareersPortal Career Guidance Service

What is Guidance?

“Guidance facilitates people throughout their lives to manage their own educational, training, occupational, personal, social and life choices so that they reach their full potential and contribute to the development of a better society.” (National Guidance Forum Report 2007)

CareersPortal provides a professional guidance counselling service for students and adults who would like support in making career, educational and/or employment decisions.

This service is of particular benefit to career changers, jobseekers, students and those looking to explore their career and education options.

To book an appointment contact Bernadette Walsh at bwalsh@careersportal.ie or phone: 01-2090797. All guidance counsellors are fully qualified professionals and members of the Institute of Guidance Counsellors.

Note: This is a fee paying appointment service. We cannot provide individual guidance advice by telephone.

Insitute of Guidance Counsellors

The Institute of Guidance Counsellors (IGC) is the professional body representing over 1200 guidance practitioners in second level schools, third level colleges, adult guidance services, private practice and in other settings. 

There are trained guidance professionals available that can help support you with your career planning and decisions. 

Go to the IGC WebsiteFor a list of registered private practitioners with the IGC click here.

Department of Social Protection

If you are currently unemployed, there may also be supports available when making employment and education decisions.

The Department of Social Protection have a number of key employment support services that provide information and advice for individuals in receipt of social welfare.

Contact information for all organisations and services that provide information and guidance to jobseekers is available here.
  Hint: Intel
At the moment Im still training into a new career in Intel, so currently I am busy getting up to standard with the in s and outs of running the process. I hope to advance on to do my masters and PhD in future years and know that Intel will help me to do this.
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