Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Brian Howard from Department of Education and Skills to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Brian Howard

Guidance Counsellor

Department of Education and Skills

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  Brian Howard

This career involves working with people in a caring capacity. If you have no interest in helping people personally or educationally then this may be the wrong profession for you.

Empathy, patience and respect are important qualities for this job, in addition to be able to relate well to the person you are dealing with. As there is also a large amount of information to be handled in the job, good organisational, IT and time management skills are also quite important.

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Administrative?
Administrative 
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Career Advice Work Life Balance

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Work Life Balance

Work-life balance day is March 1st. Employers and organisations are encouraged to engage in activities in that are aimed at highlighting work-life balance practices and the benefits that alternative working arrangements can provide to busineses and employees.

It can be challenging for some people to create a healthy balance between work and enjoying life, however, it is possible. To do this we need to have the right attitude and take responsibility for looking after not just our physical health but our mental health and wellbeing. 

For most people striking a healthy work life balance means ensuring their home life gets as much time, attention and energy as their work lives. People can find themselves "juggling" all their commitments including work, study, family and friends and leisure. Statistics indicate that one in four people will have experience of a mental health difficulty and high levels of stress can be a contributory factor.

So work life balance is about being clear about what is important to you in each area of your life and prioritising daily decisions to achieve what you want. For example: you may need to put more time into study just before an exam or family if you have a sick child or relative. 

Some Tips for achieving the balance:

  • Learn to say No - by understanding what your needs and priorities are you are more likely to be clear about the things you don't need to take on in your life.
  • Create more Space for yourself - you can always create more time by dropping the things you don't need. For example: how much time do you spend on social media sites or watching soaps? This time could be better spent on doing an activity that helps to de-stress and energise you like reading, taking up an activity with family, friends and relaxation.

  • Evaluate your relationship with work - with the economic downturn more and more people are working harder and longer hours it can be tempting to clock up the hourse with increased workloads or by trying to earn a promotion. However, are you married to your work? The knockon effect of working too much can lead to fatigue, stress, losing time with family and friends and increased expectations about your role in work. However, there are ways of ensuring work does not take ove your life including:

Leave work at work: with the ever increasing technology it can be tempting to be available. Create a boundry around your work/home time.

Find out about the many work options: you may have more flexibility around your working week than you you realise. Discuss these with your employer. To view these options: click here

Have a good support system: tune into your supports at work this could be a co-worker, supervisor or mentor. Having good relationships at work ease stressful situations and are important for job satisfaction.       

For more information on work-life balance:

www.equality.ie

www.mentalhealthireland.ie