Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Siobhan Canny from Health Service Executive to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Siobhan Canny

Midwife

Health Service Executive

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  Siobhan Canny

I would advise anybody wishing to pursue a career as a Midwife to focus on having science subjects in their Leaving Certificate. The basic entrance requirements are high at the moment so a good Leaving Certificate is essential (unless applying as a mature applicant).

To be accepted onto a training course you have to do an interview where they will determine whether you are suitable for the job or not. In the interview I would advise you to relax and to be yourself, answer honestly and do not be afraid to promote yourself.

The interviewers are looking for intellegent, hard working, nice people who are genuinely interested in being with women in pregnancy and labour. They are looking for students who have a basic understanding as to what this entails.

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The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Dorothy Creaven - Electronic Engineer

Dorothy Creaven talks to Smart Futures about running her own tech company.

What’s a typical day like?

Often I’m creating business leads, looking at partnering with companies or working on strategy for Element Wave. I am on my email all day. I use Twitter to keep an eye on what’s going on, especially around the mobile space, and I read tech blogs. Then there are meetings via Skype or WebEx or travelling to meet customers in Europe.

Why did you choose electronic engineering in NUI Galway?

I was good at maths, physics and science-based subjects, so it seemed like a good choice. The course ranged from hardware design to software programming to micro-electronics. It gave me plenty of options afterwards.

Tell me about your first job?

My first job was as a software developer in Cuan Studios, a recording studio and software house in Spiddal, Co Galway. I was developing plug-ins for ProTools (a digital audio workstation), creating different sound effects for music and audio files. You could actually hear what you were trying to do with the algorithms that you were running the audio through.

What does Element Wave do?

We help brands to encourage people to come back to their mobile apps more often. Many companies invest significantly in mobile app development but, often, a lot of people are not using them. We came up with a way to encourage people to come back to these apps and created a way for companies to communicate with these app users. It combines a user analytics system and mobile push notifications platform. It is a little piece of code that fits into any mobile app.

Who are your customers?

In Ireland, our customers include the GAA and RTÉ. Our target industries are entertainment, sport and media, and we are also in the gaming space. A lot of our customers are from the UK, the Netherlands and Sweden.

What do you most enjoy about your present role?

I love that it is so varied. Myself and James Harkin, Element Wave’s co-founder, are the main drivers of where the company is going. It is great to be in control of your own future. The sky is the limit.

Were there subjects in school that proved useful?

I would say definitely higher level maths and also physics. Maths gives you a good base for crunching numbers and physics is important for understanding how things work.

What do you do in your free time?

I love to travel. I also go running and do yoga most mornings.

Article by: Smart Futures