Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jack McGovern from An Garda Síochána to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Jack McGovern

Garda Trainee

An Garda Síochána

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  Jack McGovern
Get a degree in any area that you are interested in. It doesn't have to be directly related to sociology or Law. Apply to become a member of the Garda Reserve Gather life experience by travelling before you join.
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Career Profile: Marketing Executive

An interest in travel attracted Orlaith Giltinan into the tourism industry. She works as a Marketing Executive at Millstreet Country Park in Cork. Orlaith graduated from CIT with a Tourism Bachelor of Business Degree. 

Why tourism?

When I was younger I couldn’t decide between tourism and social care so I volunteered part-time in the Tourist Office in Kinsale and that gave me a really good insight into the industry. I have a huge interest in travel and different cultures, so I decided to give tourism a chance and enrolled in a Tourism Bachelor of Business Degree at CIT.

What was your course like?

The course takes four years. As well as learning about hospitality, aviation and other tourism sectors, you get a good grounding in general business and you learn about marketing, law and finance. Even if you don’t go into tourism at the end of the course, it is a good business degree.

Was it easy to get a job after college?

I got a job straight away. At the end of fourth year we had a careers day where you get to meet with prospective employers and I was offered a position as marketing assistant with Millstreet Country Park which is an eco-tourism destination in Cork.

What does the role entail?

Our season runs from March to September so it’s all hands on deck on busy days, then in the quieter months when we’re closed I can focus on things like developing the brochure and planning tours and events for the next year. Throughout the year I make sure that the website is up-to-date, run the social media accounts, meet with sales reps from the tour companies and encourage them to bring tour groups to visit us and so on. No two days are the same so you’re never bored.

What’s the best part of your job?

Marketing and events has always interested me so I love that I can combine both here. Tourism isn’t a nine-to-five type industry, but if you work hard you will reap the rewards.

Did I mention that I have a company car?

I’m very lucky! What characteristics do you need to succeed in tourism? It’s a busy industry and you often have to juggle a lot of tasks so you need to be organised and good at time management. It helps to be outgoing and you have to be a people person.

What advice would you offer someone considering joining tourism?

Try and get experience first before you go to college to see if this is the right industry for you. When you’re in college, get as much experience as possible – it will help you in your career.

What are your plans for the future?

I went interrailing around Europe last year and I absolutely loved it, so I would love to travel more and work in tourism as I go.

Article by: 'Get a Life in Tourism' Publication 2015