Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lisa Curry from Failte Ireland to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lisa Curry

Catering Sales Executive

Failte Ireland

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  Lisa Curry
I would advise them that the sales world is not as glamorous and easy as it comes across but it can be extremely rewarding. I would recommend you go for this type of position if you are someone who enjoys a challenge and can negotiate very well.

Sales and Catering Sales as a position is a tough one and there are a lot of challenges in that you really need to be customer focused yet remember that you have to make a profit. Selling weddings is a side of my job that is very satisfying as you get to see the end result of something that you have created which at the same time is the most important event in a families and a couple’s life.
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Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Communications Consultant - European Commission

"The EU needs ‘digital natives’ – millennials who can help the EU click, copy and code its way to a more digital existence." Ian McCafferty, Communications Consultant - European Commission. 

After completing a BA in English and History at University College Dublin, I worked as a volunteer with various NGOs and non-profit organisations before deciding to pursue a Masters in International Relations in Dublin City University. This led me to take on an internship in a small NGO working with migrant communities in Ireland, which eventually evolved into a full-time job.

Over the next few years I held a number of positions related to advocacy and project management, culminating with the role of Head of Communications. That was my springboard to the EU.

Stagiaire at the European Commission 

Having become increasingly aware that many decisions being made in Brussels had a direct impact on people in Ireland and elsewhere, I wanted to get closer to the decision-making process, learn about it in a hands-on, practical manner and develop my capacity to communicate about it to raise awareness and, ultimately, get more people involved in shaping those decisions. I applied to become a stagiaire at the European Commission and was selected by its Directorate-General for Communication (DG COMM).

Over the course of the five month traineeship I took whatever opportunities came my way: I had the chance to write and to develop presentations; I asked to undertake trainings and play a role in various projects; I looked to learn what I could and get involved where possible. As a result, when a vacancy within DG COMM’s Social Media Team arose toward the end of my traineeship, I was in a good position to apply.

Social Media

The opportunities are there if you look for them. My job is to give the European Commission a voice online - more specifically, on social media. Social media is driven by storytelling, the art of which is to know your audience. As audiences vary depending on the platform in question (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc), my job is to tell a story in different ways across social media.

Every story is different and so is every day at my desk. Our approach to presenting the Commission’s key messages is always evolving, as is the way we react to responses and collect and analyse the resultant data (e.g. number of people reached, engagement rate etc). I am constantly learning. Irish graduates can bring a lot to the European Institutions: new perspectives; personal opinion; fresh energy.

The EU needs ‘digital natives’ – millennials who can help the EU click, copy and code its way to a more digital existence.

Being a native English speaker is definitely a big advantage. Having a good grasp of at least one more language is one step further. If you like the idea of working with a multi-cultural team of talented and passionate people and want to make a real difference, the EU could be for you.

gradpublicjobs.ie

Article by: Ian McCafferty