Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Linguistic 
The Linguistic's interests are usually focused on ideas and information exchange. They tend to like reading a lot, and enjoy discussion about what has been said. Some will want to write about their own ideas and may follow a path towards journalism, or story writing or editing. Others will develop skills in other languages, perhaps finding work as a translator or interpreter. Most Linguistic types will enjoy the opportunity to teach or instruct people in a topic they are interested in.
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So you want to be a Geomatic Surveyor

Have you ever wondered who creates the maps that we use on our Smart Phones and SatNavs?

Geomatic Surveyors are the professionals responsible for collecting, processing, managing and analysing geographic information. By creating “intelligent maps”, the surveyor adds information which could, for example, allow you find where you can get the best pizza in town!

Geomatic Surveyors use cutting-edge technologies including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), satellites, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and laser scanning, together with state-of-the-art information technologies, in their quest to capture information and convert it into useful, intelligent maps and 3D models.

The profession is experiencing significant growth as consumers and businesses increasingly use location based services and big data initiatives.

Where do they work?

As extremely versatile professionals, Geomatic Surveyors work in every corner of the world, from the ice caps of Antarctica to the mines of Africa and deep waters harbours of Australia - as well as here in Ireland. Geomatic careers entail great diversity, involving indoor and outdoor work locations as well as individual and team-based activities.

Career prospects are high and progression opportunities are excellent - globally, Geomatic Surveyors, including recent graduates, are in full employment and it is predicted that there will be a shortage of qualified graduates to meet the needs of the geo-services industry in the coming years.

What sort of subjects should you be interested in to pursue a career in this area?

This is a profession ideally suited to students who enjoy working with numbers. You should have a good spatial awareness, and an interest in geography and information technology. Creativity is also important as the mapping and 3D modelling requires good design skills.

 


Article by: SCSI - The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland