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Geologist

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an engineer must complete four years of college and work for several years in engineering to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€25k > 70 
Geologist
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€25 - 70 
Related Information:
Engineering Geologist: 27 - 70
Minerals/Mining Geologist: 25 - 49
Data Source(s):
FAS

Last Updated: March, 2013

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Studies the rocks, minerals and fossils that make up the crust of the earth.


The Work header image

Geologists study the origins, structure and composition of the Earth. They can find out information about the Earth by examining rocks, minerals, crystals, steam sediments and fossils.  
 
They may work for oil, mining or specialist survey companies, using their knowledge to find and extract natural resources like oil, coal, water and uranium. In oil exploration, geologists must be very confident that the right area has been found before drilling begins. They also need to know what type of structure is being drilled, and how stable it is. This information may be obtained by taking rock samples. Most oil companies have research laboratories, where geologists try to improve discovery techniques. They will also spend time doing fieldwork, possibly in remote areas, both at sea and on land.  
 
Geologists are now searching for new oil sites, for example, in the North Atlantic. Some geologists investigate the use of geothermal power (stored heat from inside the Earth) as an alternative energy source. Iceland gets most of its energy from heat stored in recently molten volcanic rock.  
 
Rainfall may also be stored in rocks below ground. Hydrogeologists are experts at finding and managing underground water resources. This work is especially important in very hot countries, where most water may be below ground.  
 
Some geologists monitor and observe the behaviour of earthquakes and volcanoes, using their research to predict eruptions and earthquakes more reliably.  
 
With any type of geological engineering or development, careful study must be made of the possible impact on the environment, including people, animals, buildings, roads and railways. A range of geological data may be sampled before any work takes place, including the type and thickness of underlying bedrock. Geologists must take into account faults and weaknesses in the area, which may cause drainage problems, or instability. They also work with mining companies to help them to identify where ore deposits are located. 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Analyze and interpret geological, geochemical, or geophysical information from sources such as survey data, well logs, bore holes, or aerial photos.

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Plan or conduct geological, geochemical, or geophysical field studies or surveys, sample collection, or drilling and testing programs used to collect data for research or application.

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Prepare geological maps, cross-sectional diagrams, charts, or reports concerning mineral extraction, land use, or resource management, using results of fieldwork or laboratory research.

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Analyze and interpret geological data, using computer software.

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Investigate the composition, structure, or history of the Earth's crust through the collection, examination, measurement, or classification of soils, minerals, rocks, or fossil remains.

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Assess ground or surface water movement to provide advice regarding issues such as waste management, route and site selection, or the restoration of contaminated sites.

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Locate and estimate probable natural gas, oil, or mineral ore deposits or underground water resources, using aerial photographs, charts, or research or survey results.

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Locate and review research articles or environmental, historical, or technical reports.

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Communicate geological findings by writing research papers, participating in conferences, or teaching geological science at universities.

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Measure characteristics of the Earth, such as gravity or magnetic fields, using equipment such as seismographs, gravimeters, torsion balances, or magnetometers.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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Processing Information:  Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

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Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others:  Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems:  Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Thinking Creatively:  Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Provide Consultation and Advice to Others:  Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Mathematics:  Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Physics:  Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

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Geography:  Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.

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Chemistry:  Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Science:   Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

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Mathematics:   Using mathematics to solve problems.

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Judgment and Decision Making:   Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

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Active Learning:   Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

Geologists must be responsible, self-reliant, well-motivated and have good communication skills.  
 
The Field Geologist needs to be in good physical condition, able to cope with differing weather conditions, and have sharp eyesight.  
 
The Geologist may often have to take sole charge of a project and will, therefore, require the ability to organise and lead a mixed group of people. He or she must be prepared to work, if overseas, in remote terrains and be prepared to travel widely as project requirements dictate.  
 
However, not all Geologists engage in field work. Geology is a multi-disciplinary subject and there are many branches involving laboratory or aerial photographic studies. Geologists should be enthusiastic about their science, have good powers of observation, good judgement and logical thought.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Geologist - from:  icould [UK] Video
Go..Geologist, engineering - from:  GradIreland
Go..Mine geologist - from:  GradIreland

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Institute of Geologists of Ireland
  Address: Geology Department, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4
  Tel: (01) 716 2085
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: Geological Survey of Ireland
  Address: Beggars Bush, Haddington Rd., Dublin 4
  Tel: (01) 678 2000 / LoCall 1890 4499 00
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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