Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Alan O'Neill from Bord Iascaigh Mhara to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Alan O'Neill

Fisherman

Bord Iascaigh Mhara

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  Alan O'Neill
Some may think that you can go untrained into fishing. The best advice I would give people considering fishing as a profession is to get training. Fishing is an all encompassing career - when you need to go fishing, the rest of your life goes on hold unfortunately. It is very unpredictabe because you could be fishing non stop for three weeks and tied up for two.
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Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Occupation Details

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Oceanographer

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an engineer must complete four years of college and work for several years in engineering to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

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Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€23k >  
Oceanographer
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€23 -  
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
FAS

Last Updated: March, 2011

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Studies the oceans and seas of the world, how they work and what they do.


The Work header image

Oceanographers study the physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in the sea, and the complex interactions between them. Oceans and seas are vitally important to life on Earth, providing food, energy and minerals. They also have a major influence on global climate.  
 
Oceanographers study and analyse damage to ocean environments, and find out if humans are making safe use of the sea's resources.  
 
Oceanographers' knowledge of marine physics is useful to exploration industries. For example, they study wave heights and storm tides, and their findings may help to decide the location of an offshore oil rig. Wave energy is analysed to help prevent coastal erosion.  
 
Oceanographers may research and develop the use of waves and tides as alternative energy sources. By using geophysical techniques like seismic surveying, oceanographers can find oil, gas and mineral reserves on or under the sea floor.  
 
Marine chemistry and geochemistry involve research into the composition of sea water, marine organisms and sea floor sediments. Oceanographers monitor the effects of chemicals on marine food chains.  
 
A huge number of organisms live in the seas and oceans; many have benefits for humans. For example, some types of sponge contain anti-cancer compounds. There is a continuing need to find out more about marine life. Oceanographers may take samples from fish, and see if they have absorbed dangerous levels of radiation from nuclear waste dumped at sea. They also monitor environmental damage to coral reefs.  
 
The seas and oceans play an important role in global climate systems. Oceanographers measure and observe sea levels, ice masses and ocean currents, and use their observations to monitor climate change. 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Analyze and interpret geological, geochemical, or geophysical information from sources such as survey data, well logs, bore holes, or aerial photos.

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Plan or conduct geological, geochemical, or geophysical field studies or surveys, sample collection, or drilling and testing programs used to collect data for research or application.

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Prepare geological maps, cross-sectional diagrams, charts, or reports concerning mineral extraction, land use, or resource management, using results of fieldwork or laboratory research.

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Analyze and interpret geological data, using computer software.

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Investigate the composition, structure, or history of the Earth's crust through the collection, examination, measurement, or classification of soils, minerals, rocks, or fossil remains.

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Assess ground or surface water movement to provide advice regarding issues such as waste management, route and site selection, or the restoration of contaminated sites.

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Locate and estimate probable natural gas, oil, or mineral ore deposits or underground water resources, using aerial photographs, charts, or research or survey results.

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Locate and review research articles or environmental, historical, or technical reports.

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Communicate geological findings by writing research papers, participating in conferences, or teaching geological science at universities.

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Measure characteristics of the Earth, such as gravity or magnetic fields, using equipment such as seismographs, gravimeters, torsion balances, or magnetometers.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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Processing Information:  Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

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Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others:  Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems:  Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Thinking Creatively:  Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Provide Consultation and Advice to Others:  Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Mathematics:  Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Physics:  Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

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Geography:  Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.

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Chemistry:  Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Science:   Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

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Mathematics:   Using mathematics to solve problems.

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Judgment and Decision Making:   Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

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Active Learning:   Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

You must have good communication skills, and be able to express yourself clearly, both verbally and in writing. You must have a flexible and enquiring mind, and good problem solving skills.  
 
You will need mathematical and computer skills to analyse and interpret data. You need to enjoy working both out doors and in a laboratory, so flexibility is important. Knowledge of environmental issues is very important.  
 
You need good teamwork skills to support and work alongside colleagues and scientists.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Marine Biologist - from:  YouTube Video
Go..Oceanographer - from:  N.C.S. [UK]
Go..Oceanographer - from:  GradIreland

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences NUIG
  Address: National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway
  Tel: (091) 492126
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: Smart Futures
  Address: Discover Science & Engineering, Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin, 2
  Tel: (01) 607 3171
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Maritime, Fishing & Aquaculture
Earth Science & Environment
Space Science and Technology

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