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Tomas Flanagan

Occupational Therapist

St. Michael's House

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  Tomas Flanagan

I would advise anyone interested in Occupational Therapy to read up on the profession or else try to meet a qualified Occupational Therapist and talk to them about their work.

The internet can be a great resource in getting information. Also information from the universities might indicate if this is a course that is suited to you. A lot of the course work relies on you being a self-directed learner. This makes the course different to other more mainstream/academic courses as the onus is on the student to complete a lot of work independently.

As this is a caring profession an interest in working with people is a must. You also need to be a good communicator as you will be working closely with clients, families and other staff on an ongoing basis.

Organisational skills are essential to enable you to manage a caseload.

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Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Occupation Details

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Warehouse Manager

Job Zone

Education
Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, electricians typically complete four years of training in order to perform the job.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

€30k > 70 
Warehouse Supervisor
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€30 - 70 
Related Information:
Warehouse Manager: 35 - 65
Warehouse Supervisor: 30 - 55
Data Source(s):
Morgan McKinley / CPL / Sigmar

Last Updated: May, 2014

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
Shortage Indicator

The National Skills Bulletin 2016 identified shortages of skills relevant to supply chain management. These include transport management, warehouse management, materials management, raw materials forecasting/planning (junior roles), inventory control/planning, freight sales, and freight forwarding (air & ocean); the demand was particularly strong for those with experience, industry specific knowledge (e.g. high tech manufacturing, FMCG), foreign languages and relevant technical skills (e.g. SAP BI and analytics).

-4%
Occupational Category

Managers & Directors in Transport & Logistics

Also included in this category:

Transport managers; fleet managers; logistics managers; storage managers; warehouse managers

Number Employed:

6,900

Part time workers: 10%
Aged over 55: 17%
Male / Female: 84 / 16%
Non-Nationals: 10%
With Third Level: 43%
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Saves this course to your Career File if you are registered.

At a Glance... header image

Responsible for the management and day-to-day running of a warehouse.


The Work header image

Warehouse managers organise the scheduling of deliveries to and from the warehouse and keep a record of goods that arrive and leave. They also organise the efficient storage of goods within the warehouse and the retrieval of goods ordered by customers or other departments. They are required to keep track of stock levels using computer systems and ensuring that products like chemicals, drugs, food and alcohol are stored according to regulations.  
 
In the stacking and storage of goods, managers have to make sure that any special requirements are met. For example, some goods are particularly fragile, others need to be maintained at certain temperatures, and some must be rotated in date order.  
 
The Warehouse Manager is responsible for making the best use of space and equipment, bearing in mind operational and safety requirements. They need to make sure that security arrangements are adequate.  
 
Managers make sure that staff follow set procedures for safety and security in their warehouses, and are familiar with the fire precautions covering buildings and the goods in store. They also have to plan and organise on-site maintenance of plant, machinery and warehouse buildings.  
 
Managers are responsible for the supervision and training of all grades of warehouse staff. In some warehouses, managers may need to participate in activities such as loading and unloading lorries and signing delivery notes. However, some managers are responsible for large warehouse departments or several warehouses, and rarely become involved in routine tasks.  
 
The nature of warehouse work is becoming increasingly technical, and managers use computer systems for stock control and the location and retrieval of goods.

 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Plan work schedules and assign duties to maintain adequate staff for effective performance of activities and response to fluctuating workloads.

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Collaborate with workers and managers to solve work-related problems.

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Review work throughout the work process and at completion to ensure that it has been performed properly.

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Transmit and explain work orders to laborers.

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Check specifications of materials loaded or unloaded against information contained in work orders.

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Inform designated employees or departments of items loaded or problems encountered.

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Examine freight to determine loading sequences.

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Evaluate employee performance and prepare performance appraisals.

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Perform the same work duties as those supervised or perform more difficult or skilled tasks or assist in their performance.

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Prepare and maintain work records and reports of information such as employee time and wages, daily receipts, or inspection results.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Handling and Moving Objects:  Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

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Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships:  Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others:  Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

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Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates:  Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Scheduling Work and Activities:  Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

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Coaching and Developing Others:  Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

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Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others:  Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems:  Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Administration and Management:  Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

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Customer and Personal Service:  Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Production and Processing:  Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

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Transportation:  Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Management of Personnel Resources:   Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Negotiation:   Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.

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Coordination:   Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

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Time Management:   Managing one's own time and the time of others.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Social Perceptiveness:   Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

You must be able to give clear instructions and motivate staff to work precisely and consistently. A cheerful but firm, authoritative manner is necessary. You should have good communication skills.  
 
You need to be able to work within agreed budgets and to plan and prioritise work. You must be good at figure, telephone and paperwork and be able to use computer systems. You must also be able to remain calm under pressure.  
 
Managers need to understand the policies and priorities of their company. They also need to be able to understand and adhere to relevant government and EU regulations. You should have good numeracy and IT skills. You should also have good leadership qualities.  
 
Warehouse managers involved in routine tasks need to be physically fit.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Cargo Planner - from:  Aer Lingus [Video]
Go..Warehouse Manager - from:  N.C.S. [UK]

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Irish Institute of Purchasing and Materials Management
  Address: 17, Lower Mount St., Dublin 2
  Tel: (01) 644 9660
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: National Institute for Transport & Logistics (NITL)
  Address: Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin 1.
  Tel: (01) 402 3000
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: Supply Chain Management Institute (IPICS)
  Address: Unit 2A, Kilnap Business & Technology Park, Mallow Road, Cork City.
  Tel: (021) 490 9700
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport in Ireland
  Address: 1 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2
  Tel: Freephone 1890 2525 99
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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Career Articles

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Transport & Logistics
Sales, Retail & Purchasing
Mechanical Engineering & Manufacturing

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