Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Liz O'Toole from Bord Iascaigh Mhara to give some advice for people considering this job:


Liz O'Toole


Bord Iascaigh Mhara

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  Liz O'Toole
Talk to people currently in the job. Get a few days work experience. Check out the courses (through BIM)

Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Job Zone

Some of these occupations may require a Leaving Certificate or similar.

Related Experience
Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include taxi drivers, amusement and recreation attendants, counter clerks, construction laborers, and waiters or waitresses.

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At a Glance... header image

Drives an elegant passenger vehicle such as a limousine.

The Work header image

Chauffeurs/chauffeuses work for private households, large companies and local or central government departments. Their main duty is to drive people to and from their destinations. They may also run errands for their employers.  
Those employed by private households may have to drive their employers to appointments and social events. They may also drive their employers' children to school. Those employed by large companies may drive senior executives or guests to meetings, airports, railway stations or hotels. Local or central government chauffeurs/chauffeuses might drive ministers or foreign visitors to various official functions.  
Additional duties may include basic maintenance of the vehicle, such as cleaning or filling with petrol. Chauffeurs/chauffeuses also have to plan routes and may need to provide travel information to passengers.  
In some private households, driving may be combined with other domestic duties.  
There are also services which hire out cars with chauffeurs e.g. limousines for weddings. Although the term chauffeur applies to anyone who drives for a living it usually implies to someone who drives a luxury car. They provide attentive customer service and pay attention to detail. Chauffeur services offer only pre -arranged trips. 

Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation


Follow relevant safety regulations and state laws governing vehicle operation and ensure that passengers follow safety regulations.


Test vehicle equipment such as lights, brakes, horns, or windshield wipers, to ensure proper operation.


Arrange to pick up particular customers or groups on a regular schedule.


Provide passengers with assistance entering and exiting vehicles, and help them with any luggage.


Notify dispatchers or company mechanics of vehicle problems.


Complete accident reports when necessary.


Communicate with dispatchers by radio, telephone, or computer to exchange information and receive requests for passenger service.


Drive taxicabs, limousines, company cars, or privately owned vehicles to transport passengers.


Perform routine vehicle maintenance such as regulating tire pressure and adding gasoline, oil, and water.


Pick up passengers at prearranged locations, at taxi stands, or by cruising streets in high traffic areas.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.


Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships:  Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.


Performing for or Working Directly with the Public:  Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.


Assisting and Caring for Others:  Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.


Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment:  Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.


Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.


Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings:  Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.


Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.


Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People:  Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.


Handling and Moving Objects:  Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.


Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material:  Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.


Customer and Personal Service:  Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


Transportation:  Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.


Public Safety and Security:  Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.


English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Administration and Management:  Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.


Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.


Social Perceptiveness:   Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.


Operation and Control:   Controlling operations of equipment or systems.


Service Orientation:   Actively looking for ways to help people.


Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.


Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.


Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.


Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.


Coordination:   Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.


Operation Monitoring:   Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

You will need to be an experienced driver. You should also be friendly, polite and helpful. Above all, it is important to be punctual.  
Practical skills may occasionally be useful. Knowledge of routes is also necessary. Good personal grooming is essential. A good level of fitness is required as you will be required to load and unload luggage.

Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

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Go..Chauffeur - from:  N.C.S. [UK]

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image


Organisation: National Employment Rights Authority
  Address: Information Services, Government Buildings, O'Brien Road, Carlow
  Tel: (059) 917 8990 Locall: 1890 80 80 90
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here


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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...

...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Transport & Logistics

Search for Related Courses from Qualifax - the National Learners Database


Higher Ed & CAO Course suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.
Courses found: 7

Further Ed & PLC Course Suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.

Courses found: 3