Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Martin Dunn from Failte Ireland to give some advice for people considering this job:


Martin Dunn

Activities Manager

Failte Ireland

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  Martin Dunn
  • Qualities & Values - Patience, hard work, like meeting people, enjoy providing good customer service, desire to do a good job for yourself and your employer 
  • Client Skills - Qualification both education qualifications and practical ability to the job
  • Interests - to be generally interested in the field you are working in. I think that it is easy for people to look at the job and think its great and must be loads of fun because you get to go on the high ropes all the time. That is just a small part of the job and generally you are watching others having fun and playing on the activities and you only go on them to do staff training or to do safety checks. You must also be prepared for the paper work that goes along with a job where you are responsible for that safety of people and this cannot be overlooked.

Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Commodity Broker

Job Zone

Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, electricians typically complete four years of training in order to perform the job.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

Occupational Category

Brokers & Insurance Underwriters

Also included in this category:

Stockbrokers; foreign exchange dealers; insurance brokers; underwriters; insurance inspectors; mortgage underwriters

Number Employed:


Part time workers: 15%
Aged over 55: 20%
Male / Female: 60 / 40%
Non-Nationals: 11%
With Third Level: 84%
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At a Glance... header image

Commodity brokers buy and sell physical commodities (crude oil, grain, metals, coffee, sugar) on a commission basis on behalf of private and commercial clients.

The Work header image

A Commodity Broker must typically keep a keen eye on the market in relation to product and investment pricing, trends and demand. Some traders receive purchase and selling instructions, meeting with other commodity traders to negotiate transactions.

Others may take client orders over the phone, performing deals via computer to a firm's trading department or directly on the floor of a stock exchange. Additionally, traders provide financial advice, often meeting with clients to plan, review or update an investment portfolio. 

Work activities also include:

  • Interpreting market reports
  • Trading on behalf of clients
  • Liaising with transport, shipping and insurance companies
  • Devising hedging strategies
  • Visiting international suppliers
  • Negotiating price, specification and delivery details
  • Investigating new business openings
Employers of commodity brokers include investment banks, commodity brokers, financial clearing houses and exchanges. 

Personal Qualitiesheader image

Commondity Brokers need to be self motivated and determined workers. Having a competitve nature is also advantageous for this role. 

Excellant numeracy skills and an ability to negotiate are also essential. Good organisational skills are crucial in order to react to market movements and respond to client needs efficiently.

Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

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Go..Commodity broker - from:  GradIreland

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...

...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Banking, Insurance & Financial Services

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