Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Nicole Feighery from Insurance to give some advice for people considering this job:


Nicole Feighery

Customer Care Manager


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  Nicole Feighery
I would offer 3 pieces of advice:

- Have a open mind and embrace change in order to grow
- Believe in yourself and your team - anything is possible!
- Be a problem solver, any problem big or small has a solution if you commit to finding one.

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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At a Glance... header image

A Diplomat represents their country’s government overseas, and counsel on international issues.

The Work header image

  • Representing the Government on international issues affecting the country
  • Promoting policy and businesses to overseas governments, individuals, organisations and the media
  • Negotiating international agreements e.g. drug control or endangered species
  • Developing an understanding of local business practices and helping companies understand legislation surrounding the export of their goods and services
  • Gathering information about the political and economic state of the host country
  • Report writing and advising government ministers on relevant developments
  • Detail project planning, anticipating problems
  • Co-ordinating workload to ensure accurate project delivery
  • Working to frequent tight deadlines
  • Organising high-level Irish Government visits and hosting social functions
  • Assisting Irish citizens in difficulties abroad

Personal Qualitiesheader image

  • Adaptability and resourcefulness
  • Analysis and evaluation
  • Strong planning and organisational skills
  • Ability to persuade and influence and to cultivate institutional and personal relationships at many levels.
  • Willingness and ability to work in foreign languages
  • Communication skills (both orally and in writing)
  • Presentation skills
  • Ability to work independently 
  • Interest in public affairs and in international relations
  • Awareness of political, economic, social and cultural life

Entry Routesheader image

Third Secretary is the entry grade to a diplomatic career. Diplomat is basically a training grade from which (subject to suitability for the role), a Third Secretary can be promoted to First Secretary.

Further competitive processes open the path for promotion to Counsellor and higher roles, such as Ambassador.

The role of Diplomat is open to graduates of all disciplines, in particular those who have qualified as a solicitor/barrister. A first or second class honours degree is essential. Relevant degree subjects include: Economics, History, Law, Politics, Public administration and Modern languages.

Last Updated: July, 2014

Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Diplomat - from:  GradIreland
Go..Diplomatic Service Officer - from:  N.C.S. [UK]

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image


Organisation: EU Careers - European Personnel Selection Office (EPSO)
  Address: Candidate Contact Service, Office C-80 00/40, B1049 Brussels
  Tel: +32 (0) 2 299 3131
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here


Organisation: Public Appointments Service
  Address: Chapter House, 26/30 Abbey Street Upper, Dublin 1
  Tel: (01) 858 7400 or Locall: 1890 44 9999
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here


Organisation: European Movement Ireland
  Address: 8 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2,
  Tel: (0)1 662 5815
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here


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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...

...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Civil & Public Service, Local Government, Politics & EU

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