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Eileen Faherty

Electrician / Quantity Surveyor

Construction Industry Federation

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  Eileen Faherty
My advice would be that if you are not afraid of hard work that construction can be a very rewarding industry. It is a constantly changing industry which is interesting to work in.

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Occupation Details

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Food Technologist

Job Zone

Education
Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, electricians typically complete four years of training in order to perform the job.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

€28k > 55 
Food Technologist
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€28 - 55 
Related Information:
Food Microbiologist: 28 - 55
Food Chemist: 28 - 45
Data Source(s):
Morgan McKinley

Last Updated: July, 2015

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
5%
Occupational Category

Food, Drink & Tobacco Process Operatives

Also included in this category:

Bakers (food products manufacturing); factory workers (food products manufacturing); bakery assistants; process workers (brewery); process workers (dairy)

Number Employed:

13,300

Part time workers: 12%
Aged over 55: 12%
Male / Female: 73 / 27%
Non-Nationals: 38%
With Third Level: 18%
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At a Glance... header image

Food technologists are employed by a variety of public and private sector organisations including food manufacturing and retail companies, universities, central government organisations and specialist research associations/consultancies.


The Work header image

Food technicians work in food production. They test the safety and quality of food, and may help to research and develop products.  
 
The aim of quality assurance is to avoid poor quality food by carrying chemical analysis at key stages of the production process. Food technicians use a very strict procedure called Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP). This means they can identify problems at each stage of production, and take steps to make sure the food is safe. For example, they test food for harmfulF micro-organisms that can cause food poisoning. They also have the responsibility for analysis and collection of results.  
 
Technicians also test the materials used to package food, to make sure they meet national and European standards for safety and quality. They also provide back up and support to the Food Scientist.

 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Check raw ingredients for maturity or stability for processing and finished products for safety, quality, and nutritional value.

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Inspect food processing areas to ensure compliance with government regulations and standards for sanitation, safety, quality, and waste management standards.

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Evaluate food processing and storage operations and assist in the development of quality assurance programs for such operations.

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Study methods to improve aspects of foods, such as chemical composition, flavor, color, texture, nutritional value, and convenience.

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Stay up-to-date on new regulations and current events regarding food science by reviewing scientific literature.

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Test new products for flavor, texture, color, nutritional content, and adherence to government and industry standards.

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Develop food standards and production specifications, safety and sanitary regulations, and waste management and water supply specifications.

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Develop new or improved ways of preserving, processing, packaging, storing, and delivering foods, using knowledge of chemistry, microbiology, and other sciences.

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Confer with process engineers, plant operators, flavor experts, and packaging and marketing specialists to resolve problems in product development.

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Study the structure and composition of food or the changes foods undergo in storage and processing.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

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Thinking Creatively:  Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

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Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others:  Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

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Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings:  Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems:  Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Processing Information:  Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Production and Processing:  Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

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Chemistry:  Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.

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Food Production:  Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

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Biology:  Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Judgment and Decision Making:   Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

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Active Learning:   Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Time Management:   Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

As a food technician you will need a good general understanding of scientific techniques. You will also need to understand the principles of food processing and preservation, the composition of food and food hygiene. You must be able to work in teams, and on your own, depending on the demands of different projects.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Food technologist - from:  GradIreland
Go..Food Technologist - from:  iCould [UK] Video

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Teagasc - Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority
  Address: Head Office, Oak Park, Carlow
  Tel: (059) 917 0200
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry & Food
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