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Kevin Keary

Parliamentary Assistant

EU Careers

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  Kevin Keary
Be proactive and look for the areas that interest you whether it’s the Environment or Human Rights and find MEP’s or interest groups that specialise in those interests and take the initiative to send them your CV.

Having a European language would help you considerably in this career. Irish should also not be ruled out as an option as this is considered as a second language.
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Occupation Details

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Geochemist

Job Zone

Education
Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, electricians typically complete four years of training in order to perform the job.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

€25k >  
Geochemist
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€25 -  
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
FAS

Last Updated: March, 2013

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Geochemists monitor developments in the earth's chemical composition by undertaking analysis of rock and other environmental samples.


The Work header image

Geochemists study the type and distribution of chemicals that make up the Earth, for example, in rocks, soil and water. They also study the chemical processes that occur on and beneath the Earth's surface. They develop information about the age, nature and structure of specific areas.  
 
In fieldwork, geochemists may collect soil and stream sediment samples. In the laboratory, they use computers to analyse the samples' chemical composition. Geochemists use the results to map the location and concentration of chemical elements over large areas of land. This helps them to find the probable location of resources like oil, coal or uranium, and leads to exploratory mining or drilling. The formation and movement of natural gas is traced by geochemists in gas companies, to work out how much gas is present, and where it can be extracted.  
 
Geochemists may also identify the presence of chemical pollution, for example, in soil, or in water below the Earth's surface (the water table). They may investigate landfill or disused industrial sites, and see if pollution has seeped into rocks, soil or water.  
 
Geochemists are important to agriculture. For example, they may assess the lime content of soil. Lime is a very cheap and abundant source of alkalinity, and may be used by farmers to reduce soil acidity. Geochemists may identify chemicals in the soil that can harm crops. For example, pollutants react with minerals in the soil, and can stop plants taking up certain nutrients. They provide support and recommendations to mainstream geologists. 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Analyze organic or inorganic compounds to determine chemical or physical properties, composition, structure, relationships, or reactions, using chromatography, spectroscopy, or spectrophotometry techniques.

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Conduct quality control tests.

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Maintain laboratory instruments to ensure proper working order and troubleshoot malfunctions when needed.

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Prepare test solutions, compounds, or reagents for laboratory personnel to conduct tests.

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Induce changes in composition of substances by introducing heat, light, energy, or chemical catalysts for quantitative or qualitative analysis.

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Evaluate laboratory safety procedures to ensure compliance with standards or to make improvements as needed.

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Compile and analyze test information to determine process or equipment operating efficiency or to diagnose malfunctions.

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Write technical papers or reports or prepare standards and specifications for processes, facilities, products, or tests.

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Confer with scientists or engineers to conduct analyses of research projects, interpret test results, or develop nonstandard tests.

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Develop, improve, or customize products, equipment, formulas, processes, or analytical methods.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Processing Information:  Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates:  Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

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Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others:  Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

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Documenting/Recording Information:  Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings:  Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

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Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards:  Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Chemistry:  Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.

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Mathematics:  Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

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Production and Processing:  Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

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Computers and Electronics:  Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Science:   Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Mathematics:   Using mathematics to solve problems.

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Active Learning:   Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

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Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

As a geochemist, you will need good analytical skills. You must be able to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. You will need to be able to work independently as well as in a team. You must be able to read and draw geochemical maps, and use technology to analyse samples.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

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Go..Geochemist - from:  GradIreland

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Institute of Geologists of Ireland
  Address: Geology Department, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4
  Tel: (01) 716 2085
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Chemical, Biomedical & Pharmaceutical Sciences
Earth Science & Environment

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