Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Ophthalmologist

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require post-graduate qualifications. For example, they may require a masters degree, and some require a Ph.D., or M.D.

Related Experience
Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialised medical training to be able to do their job.

Job Training
Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organisational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, aerospace engineers, wildlife biologists, school psychologists, surgeons, treasurers, and most scientists.

€82k > 86 
Community Opthalmic Physician
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€82 - 86 
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
HSE.ie

Last Updated: April, 2014

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

A fully qualified medical doctor who specialises in the correction of vision, and works in the treatment of all conditions, disorders and diseases of the eye. 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Perform ophthalmic surgeries such as cataract, glaucoma, refractive, corneal, vitro-retinal, eye muscle, and oculoplastic surgeries.

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Perform comprehensive examinations of the visual system to determine the nature or extent of ocular disorders.

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Diagnose or treat injuries, disorders, or diseases of the eye and eye structures including the cornea, sclera, conjunctiva, or eyelids.

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Document or evaluate patients' medical histories.

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Provide or direct the provision of postoperative care.

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Perform, order, or interpret the results of diagnostic or clinical tests.

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Develop treatment plans based on patients' histories and goals, the nature and severity of disorders, and treatment risks and benefits.

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Prescribe or administer topical or systemic medications to treat ophthalmic conditions and to manage pain.

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Perform laser surgeries to alter, remove, reshape, or replace ocular tissue.

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Provide ophthalmic consultation to other medical professionals.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems:  Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge:  Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Assisting and Caring for Others:  Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Processing Information:  Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

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Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings:  Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

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Controlling Machines and Processes:  Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

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Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

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Documenting/Recording Information:  Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Medicine and Dentistry:  Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Biology:  Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.

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Education and Training:  Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

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Customer and Personal Service:  Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Instructing:   Teaching others how to do something.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Active Learning:   Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Writing:   Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

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Social Perceptiveness:   Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Entry Routesheader image

A specialist is a doctor who is certified to practise independently in a specific area of medicine (eg Ophthalmology). A specialist has completed all of their postgraduate training and does not require supervision by a more senior doctor. It can take about 15 years to become a specialist. The career pathway is as follows:

1. Medical Degree  - a five to six-year undergraduate medical degree programme at one of the six medical schools in Ireland.

2. Internship - newly graduated doctors spend 12 months training in hospitals as an Intern (equivalent to ‘house officer’ in some jurisdictions), working as part of a team with nurses and experienced doctors, and earning their first salary as a doctor.

The intern year is structured so that a doctor can experience a variety of medical specialties; at least three months must be spent in general Medicine and at least three months in general Surgery. Interns can also spend 2 – 4 months in:

  • Emergency Medicine
  • General Practice
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Paediatrics
  • Psychiatry
  • Anaesthesia (to include perioperative medicine)
  • Radiology

This variety helps the intern decide which area of medicine they want to continue training in. In Ireland, the Medical Council oversees the intern year.

3. Basic Specialist Training - Towards the end of the intern year, a doctor must choose an area of medicine to continue training in. The next stage of training is Basic Specialist Training (BST).

There are 10 BST programmes in Ireland, including Ophthalmology:

BST specialty

Postgraduate Medical Training Body

Anaesthesia

College of Anaesthetists of Ireland

Emergency Medicine

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

General Internal Medicine (and its subspecialties)

Irish Committee on Higher Medical Training, RCPI

General Practice

Irish College of General Practitioners

Histopathology

Faculty of Pathology, RCPI

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, RCPI

Ophthalmology

Irish College of Ophthalmologists

Paediatrics (including Neonatology)

Faculty of Paediatrics, RCPI

Psychiatry

College of Psychiatry of Ireland

Surgery

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

In most cases BST is two years in duration. During this time a doctor works as a Senior House Officer (SHO), mostly in hospitals and always under the supervision of a more experienced doctor.

To find out more about BST with RCPI, click here.

4. Registrar Training - After BST most doctors want to progress to Higher Specialist Training (HST). Entry to HST is very competitive. Some doctors may need to wait for a year or two before they either meet all of the entry criteria (e.g. passing postgraduate exams) or are successful at interview.

In RCPI, the Registrar Training Programme (RTP) is designed for doctors who want to continue their training at registrar level with a view to progressing on to HST.

5. Higher Specialist Training (HST) - is designed to bring a doctor’s skills up to the standard required for independent, specialist practice. HST takes four to six years to complete, depending on the specialty. During this time a doctor works as a Specialist Registrar (SpR). On satisfactory completion of HST, SpRs receive a Certificate of Satisfactory Completion of Specialist Training (CSCST) which allows them to enter the Specialist Division of the Medical Council.

6. Consultant - Once a doctor is on the Specialist Division of the Register with the Medical Council they are eligible to apply for consultant posts. However is not always easy to get into these highly-regarded positions. With the exception of GPs (General Practitioners), specialists in Ireland are generally referred to as ‘consultants’.

Many doctors spend some time working abroad and building up their portfolio of research, audits and publications before becoming a consultant.

Last Updated: March, 2015


Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Irish College of Ophthalmologists
  Address: 121 St Stephens's Green, Dublin, 2
  Tel: (01) 402 2777
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

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Organisation: Irish Medical Council
  Address: Kingram House, Kingram Place, Dublin, 2
  Tel: (01) 498 3100
  Email: Click here
  Url Click here

 

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