Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tracey Roche from Analog Devices to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Tracey Roche

Design Engineer

Analog Devices

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  Tracey Roche

3 main things:

1. Be organised.

2. Try to keep a positive attitude.

3. Persevere. Working in a Design Evaluation role or indeed any electronic engineering role, requires problem-solving skills and half the battle with this is having a positive attitude. If you have a negative/pessimistic attitude, the battle to find a solution is lost before you even start. In debugging an issue, start with the basics and work from there. Like peeling an onion, gradually peel off the outter layers to reveal the inner core of the onion...as you work, you get more clues and develop a better understanding of the product/issue you are working on.

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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Foundry Worker

Job Zone

Education
These occupations usually require a Leaving Certificate or equivalent.

Related Experience
Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a bank teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognised apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, retail salespersons and tellers.

€18k >  
Foundry Worker
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€18 -  
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
FAS

Last Updated: March, 2013

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Foundry workers carry out a variety of tasks to make products from metal. There are many jobs in the different stages of the work process.


The Work header image

Foundry workers produce cast metal products, ranging from car parts to ships' propellers or church bells. Metal is melted in a furnace and the molten metal is poured into moulds made out of sand or metal. Once the metal casting has set, the mould is removed.  
 
There are a number of different occupations within the foundry industry, because there are so many different processes involved.  
 
Sand mixers or sand mill operators mix the sand mixture used for moulding, or operate sand mixing machinery. Machine moulders operate automated or hand operated moulding machinery, check moulds for faults and carry out repairs. Furnace operators load up different kinds of furnaces with a metal mixture. They check temperatures and supervise the melting process.  
 
Casters then pour the molten metal into moulds. The metal is poured using large ladles suspended from cranes or small hand-held containers known as shanks. Knock-out operators use a variety of techniques to remove the mould once the casting has cooled. Finally, fettlers, grinders and shot blasters use a variety of techniques to remove any surplus metal from the casting.  
 
Many processes are automated, so much of the heavy physical labour is rapidly disappearing.  
 
Foundry workers may have to work in hot and noisy, and sometimes dark and dirty conditions.

 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Collect samples, or signal workers to sample metal for analysis.

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Pour and regulate the flow of molten metal into molds and forms to produce ingots or other castings, using ladles or hand-controlled mechanisms.

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Read temperature gauges and observe color changes, adjusting furnace flames, torches, or electrical heating units as necessary to melt metal to specifications.

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Examine molds to ensure they are clean, smooth, and properly coated.

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Position equipment such as ladles, grinding wheels, pouring nozzles, or crucibles, or signal other workers to position equipment.

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Skim slag or remove excess metal from ingots or equipment, using hand tools, strainers, rakes, or burners, collecting scrap for recycling.

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Turn valves to circulate water through cores, or spray water on filled molds to cool and solidify metal.

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Add metal to molds to compensate for shrinkage.

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Pull levers to lift ladle stoppers and to allow molten steel to flow into ingot molds to specified heights.

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Load specified amounts of metal and flux into furnaces or clay crucibles.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Handling and Moving Objects:  Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

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Controlling Machines and Processes:  Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

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Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates:  Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

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Performing General Physical Activities:  Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

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Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material:  Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

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Training and Teaching Others:  Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

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Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings:  Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

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Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment:  Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

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Assisting and Caring for Others:  Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

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Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment:  Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Production and Processing:  Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

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Administration and Management:  Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

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Public Safety and Security:  Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Mechanical:  Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Operation and Control:   Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

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Operation Monitoring:   Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Quality Control Analysis:   Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

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Coordination:   Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

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Judgment and Decision Making:   Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

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Equipment Maintenance:   Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

You will need good hand skills and an aptitude for practical work. Some jobs, particularly in the smaller, less mechanised foundries, require physical strength for lifting and carrying. You should have good hand eye coordination.  
 
You will be required to work carefully and accurately, following safety procedures. You should be able to follow strict instructions. You also need to be able to work well with others, as part of a team.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Foundry Moulder - from:  N.C.S. [UK]
Go..Foundry Patternmaker - from:  N.C.S. [UK]
Go..Foundry Process Operator - from:  N.C.S. [UK]

Related Occupationsheader image

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Mechanical Engineering & Manufacturing

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