Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Carol Kehoe from Irish Tax Institute to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Carol Kehoe

AITI Chartered Tax Adviser

Irish Tax Institute

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  Carol Kehoe
I advise the following:
  1. What subjects do you like in school? If you like figures - then this may be the one for you!
  2. Are you a good communicator? If so, you will likely make a good Registered Tax Consultant. Good communication is vital - written and verbal. 
  3. Get some work experience - try to work in an accountant's office, preferably a tax department if the office is large enough. 
  4. Only pursue a career as a Registered Tax Consultant if you are prepared to study after college/university to gain an additional qualification. It's well worth it!
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Administrative?
Administrative 
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Engineer - Structural

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an engineer must complete four years of college and work for several years in engineering to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€25k > 50 
Structural Engineer
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€25 - 50 
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
Brightwater / CPL

Last Updated: May, 2014

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Designs and supervises the safe construction of structures like bridges, stadiums and large buildings.


Videos & Interviews header image

1Total Records: 2

Maria O'Neill
Civil Engineer  

Maria works as an Assistant Resident Engineer supervising a water supply scheme for the Local Authorities. She did her Leaving Cert in St. David's in Greystones, and went on to UCD to complete a Civil Engineering Degree.

Go to Interview  
 
Louise Lynch
Structural Engineer  
Louise Lynch is a Structural Engineer with ESB International. She did Preliminary Engineering in  DIT Bolton St. (1 yr, Introductory Course) and then went on to do the Honours Degree in Structural Engineering there. She loves the travel associated with her job.  ESB International has work in many locations including South Africa, Spain and Vietnam.
Go to Interview  
 

The Work header image

Structural engineering is a branch of civil engineering. Structural engineers deal with the design of framework and foundations for buildings and structures such as bridges, sports stadia, masts, tower blocks and oil platforms. They take into account their strength, shape and function. They make sure that a building or structure is stable and that it can withstand any forces to which it is subjected. This includes 'operational loads' such as people, equipment, machinery and traffic and 'environmental loads' such as snow, wind, water, soil and earthquakes.  
 
Structural engineers are usually part of a design team with other professionals such as architects, quantity surveyors, building services engineers and environmental and financial consultants. At the start of a new project, the design team looks at factors such as the environmental impact, cost and function of the structure to decide if and how a project may proceed.  
 
If the project goes ahead, structural engineers prepare documents so that construction companies can bid for the work. Structural engineers then produce detailed designs, which are the working drawings that the contractor uses to build the structure. The process of designing structures involves choosing suitable materials such as steel, concrete, brick, timber and synthetics like plastics. The design is then produced and the engineer makes checks and calculations to make sure that the foundations, roofs and floors are sound. Structural engineers often use computers to analyse structural designs and to produce detailed drawings. They must ensure that designs satisfy a given design which is dedicated to safety and service ability.  
 
When the structure is being built, the structural engineer supervises the building of foundations and frameworks on-site.  
 
Structural Engineers also play a role in designing machinery where structural integration of the item is a matter of safety e.g. aircraft, spacecraft. In recent years reinforcing structures against sabotage has become increasingly important.

 


Personal Qualitiesheader image

As a structural engineer you need to be able to analyse and solve problems; sometimes in challenging working conditions such as on muddy construction sites. You must work well with other members of a team, be prepared to take responsibility and adapt to changes. A mind for physics and maths would be beneficial.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

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Go..   Aircraft Maintenance & Engineering - from:  Aer Lingus [Video]
Go..   Structural Engineer - from:  N.C.S. [UK]
Go..   Structural Engineer - from:  YouTube Video
Go..   Structural engineer - from:  GradIreland

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Engineers Ireland
  Address: 22 Clyde Road, Ballsbridge Dublin 4
  Tel: (01) 665 1300
  Email: info@engineers.ie
  Url www.engineersireland.ie
   

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Organisation: Construction Industry Federation
  Address: Construction House, Canal Road, Dublin 6
  Tel: (01) 406 6000
  Email: cif@cif.ie
  Url www.cif.ie
   

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Organisation: Institute of Civil Engineers
  Address: 1 Great Georges St, Westminster, London SW1P 3AA
  Tel:
  Email:
  Url www.ice.org.uk
   

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Organisation: Institution of Structural Engineers
  Address: 11 Upper Belgrave St, London SW1X 8BH
  Tel:
  Email:
  Url www.istructe.org.uk
   

 

Job Search


Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following career interests...

Investigative  Realist  Administrative 

...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Building, Construction & Property

Course suggestions from Qualifax - the National Learners Database
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CAO Course suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following CAO / HETAC courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.
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