Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tracey Roche from Analog Devices to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Tracey Roche

Design Engineer

Analog Devices

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  Tracey Roche

3 main things:

1. Be organised.

2. Try to keep a positive attitude.

3. Persevere. Working in a Design Evaluation role or indeed any electronic engineering role, requires problem-solving skills and half the battle with this is having a positive attitude. If you have a negative/pessimistic attitude, the battle to find a solution is lost before you even start. In debugging an issue, start with the basics and work from there. Like peeling an onion, gradually peel off the outter layers to reveal the inner core of the onion...as you work, you get more clues and develop a better understanding of the product/issue you are working on.

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Enterprising people like situations that involve using resources for personal or corporate economic gain. Such people may have an opportunistic frame of mind, and like commerce, trade and making deals. Some are drawn to sales and marketing occupations. Many will eventually end up owning their own business, or managing a section in larger organisations. They tend to be very goal-oriented, and work best when focused on a target. Some have an entrepreneurial inclination.
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CV & Interview Preparation
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CV and Applications

Job Applications are the first vital step to getting a job interview. In this area, we look at how to give employers the information they need to ensure that they put you on the shortlist.

The majority of recruiters ask job applicants to complete a Job Application form, either online or on paper. Application forms typically ask you to provide standard biographical information and summary detail of your education and experience, together with some 'open' questions - these will give you a chance to highlight your suitability for the particular job.

The alternative application procedure is to submit a Curriculum Vitae (CV) accompanied by a Cover Letter.

There is a whole industry built up around how these two documents should be written, so it is wise to familiarise yourself with some of the advice available and avoid some of the potential pitfalls. In this section we provide some useful links to get you started. 

Your Cover Letter is the first thing a recruiter or potential employer will see, so it has to make a strong impact.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce your CV in the best way possible. There is no such thing as the perfect cover letter, but following some basic pointers will help make your letter a worthy build-up to your CV. It should make a strong impact - strong enough to make the reader want to know more about you.

Your Curriculum Vitae is the other document required. It is normally written first, and then accompanied by the Cover letter.

Follow the links for useful help and advice on preparing each of these.