Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Paul Dowling from Teagasc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Paul Dowling

Horticulturist

Teagasc

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  Paul Dowling
Ideally, try and get a job in the industry for a summer, or get a bit of experience before you go into it. You have to be happy with working outside, and doing physical work. If you are not prepared to work hard or are looking for a soft job, don't go into Landscaping. Design is very sexy at the moment, everyone wants to be a designer, a Landscape Designer. It's different on the ground, you have to be out there on sites in all weather and you have to make sure projects are managed well and you're able to muck in with everyone else. Biology is most important for anyone going into Horticulture or Landscaping as it covers propagation and helps with the identification of plant names, species and families through the universal use of Latin. Chemistry is also helpful as the use of various chemicals is a constant in horticulture. The chemical content and dangers of fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides in use in Amenity Horticulture needs to be understood anyone going into this business. Geography would be a relevant subject as well. Also, the simple things like having a full, clean driving licence, which can make you a lot more employable if you are trying for a job with a Landscape Conractor. This indicates that you are more mobile and can also drive a company van if needed. Be sure you're happy with the outdoor life. Having taken a Horticulture course will give you an advantage. However, it's possible to take a job first and study later, e.g. in IT Blanchardstown it is possible to study at night. I think you cannot beat doing the Diploma Course in the National Botanic Gardens because it is a good practical course which also covers all the theory and is invaluable for gaining plant knowledge.
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Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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CAO Course Detail

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Course Code:
DN300
Title:
Veterinary Medicine
College:
UCD (NUI)
Qualification:
Level on the National Framework of Qualifications
Duration:
5 Years

 

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Employment Sectors
Employment Sectors related to this course:
This course prepares people for careers typically found in the sectors below. You can explore information relating to sectors by clicking on the titles below.

Animals & Veterinary Science
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Sample Careers 
If you are interested in this course, then these occupations may also be of interest. Note that these suggestions are not intended to indicate that this course leads directly to these occupations, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.
Geneticist
Zoologist
Agricultural Adviser
Dairy Industry Scientist
Veterinary Surgeon
Zoo Keeper
   


 
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Veterinary Science

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This 5-year programme will educate you to the best international standards in veterinary medicine. The programme will prepare you for entry into any branch of the profession, with specific hands-on work and clinical cases in fifth year.



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Leads to the career as professional vet.

 

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DN300 - Veterinary Medicine
UCD (NUI)

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DN300 - Veterinary Medicine
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Related Course Suggestions....  (not in order)
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CAO Points 
2013 Points

575*

Change from 2012: 

-5

History:

2012 - 580*
2011 - 565
2010 - 555
2009 - 555
2008 - 545*
2007 - 550
2006 - 550*
2005 - 555*
2004 - 560
2003 - 550*
2002 - 545*
2001 - 540*
2000 - 540*

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