Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Mary Joyce from Department of Education and Skills to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Mary Joyce

Secondary School Teacher

Department of Education and Skills

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  Mary Joyce
Teaching as they say is a vocation, it is a job that requires patience and enthusiasm. If you are considering teaching you need to look beyond the holidays and think of the 9-4 Monday to Friday spent dealing with children or teenagers and the challenges which they might pose.

I would advise anyone thinking of teaching as a career to speak with Teachers and learn of their experiences, both positive and negative. I personally would encourage people to consider teaching as it is an extremely rewarding profession in terms of the interaction you get daily with young people and the colleagues you meet in the job.
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Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Disability - After Third Level
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After Third Level

The WAM Programme - Willing Able Mentoring

Willing Able Mentoring (WAM) is a work placement programme which aims to promote access to the labour market for graduates with disabilities and build the capacity of employers to integrate disability into the mainstream workplace.

How does WAM work?

Participating employers (WAM Leaders) collaborate with WAM to offer mentored, paid work placements for graduates with disabilities. This partnership brings graduates with disabilities and WAM’s network of employers together so that both can benefit from each other - ensuring genuine learning opportunities for all.

WAM is unique in that it seeks to engage and support employers in order to simultaneously develop the potential of employers and graduates with disabilities.

To apply for any WAM Placements and to be informed of WAM opportunities as they arise, please register on our WAMWorks Database

Details of the AHEAD WAM Programme are available here.

 

 



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The WAM Programme 
Work placement programme which aims to promote access to the labour market for graduates with disabilities and build the capacity of employers to integrate disability into the mainstream workplace.
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