Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Catherine Day from EU Careers to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Catherine Day

Secretary General

EU Careers

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  Catherine Day
I would advise them to give it a go - it doesn’t mean you have to work there long term. You must know how to speak a language other than your mother tongue reasonably well, as a good proficiency is essential. It’s also important to know and understand the cultural diversity that makes up the European Union.

Our internships are a great chance to come for a short period to determine where your interests lie and taste the experiences. Starting out your career path with the EU gives you a really good foundation of insider knowledge of how the EU works and is so useful professionally, even if you don’t plan on working there forever.

It is also important for young Irish people to consider moving to countries that are not English speaking and working for the EU would be very useful to your long term career.
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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Leaving Certificate Subjects

The following subjects are offered in the Leaving Cert in schools and colleges throught Ireland. Students normally choose 6 to 8 subjects from the list. Subjects are normally studied at either Ordinary or Higher Level, although two subjects, Irish and mathematics, can also be studied at Foundation Level.

Students following the Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme (LCVP) take 6 or 7 Leaving Certificate subjects and two additional Link Modules: Preparation for the World of Work and Enterprise Education.

Leaving Certificate Applied (LCA) students follow a self-contained pre-vocational programme made up of a range of courses that are structured round three elements: Vocational Preparation, Vocational Education and General Education.

The subjects are arranged into subject groups as follows:

Practical
  more...  Construction Studies
  more...  Engineering
  more...  Design & Comm Graphics
  more...  Technology
Science
  more...  Agricultural Science
  more...  Applied Maths
  more...  Biology
  more...  Chemistry
  more...  Mathematics
  more...  Physics
  more...  Physics and Chemistry
Artistic
  more...  Art
  more...  Music
Humanities
  more...  Arabic
  more...  Classical Studies
  more...  English
  more...  French
  more...  Irish
  more...  German
  more...  Hebrew Studies
  more...  History
  more...  Italian
  more...  Japanese
  more...  Latin
  more...  Russian
  more...  Spanish
  more...  Other Language
  more...  Ancient Greek
Social
  more...  Geography
  more...  Home Economics
  more...  Religious Education
  more...  Religious Education (Non Exam)
  more...  Politics & Society
Business
  more...  Accounting
  more...  Business
  more...  Economics
  more...  Agricultural Economics
  more...  Link Modules


 
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