Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Creative?
Creative 
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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School & College Education - <p>This section has information on Primary, Secondary and Third Level education in Ireland</p>
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School & College Education - <p>This section has information on Primary, Secondary and Third Level education in Ireland</p>
Adult Education - <p>This section has information on adult and continuing education, including PLC, professional, and short courses</p>
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Junior Cycle - Technical Graphics

Subject Group: Artistic
These subjects involve developing creativity and the appreciation of the work of others. This involves learning the methods and techniques of the subject and producing your own work using these skills.

Brief Description:

Technical Graphics is one of the technology subjects offered at junior cycle. In Technical Graphics you will learn how to represent 3-D objects on paper and on computer. You will develop problemsolving and creative thinking skills through the solution of graphical problems.


How will Technical Graphics be useful to me?

Technical Graphics helps you to think in a more logical and creative way. You will be able to communicate information using diagrams and sketches. You will have learned how to present information in a neat and organised fashion. This subject will be of use to you if you want to progress into career areas such as architecture or engineering.



Note: Specifications for the technology subjects will be revised in phase 4 of the Junior Cycle Developments, with the changes commencing in 2017, for certification in 2020.


Course Outline
View / Download Technical Graphics Factsheet [pdf file]
View / Download full curriculum [pdf file]

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Junior Cycle Subjects  Junior Cycle Subjects
Leaving Cert Subjects  Leaving Cert Subjects

 
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