Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:


Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer


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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Junior Cycle - Typewriting

Subject Group: Practical
These subjects are 'hands-on' and involve working with tools and machinery on physical things like wood, metals and plastic. They may involve designing, planning and building things.

Brief Description:

Typing will help you to understand the keyboard and to use it fast and proficiently. Typing is involved almost daily now as we increasingly use modern technology.

How will Typewriting be useful to me?

Developing your typing skills will enable you to write essays, assignments and project work much quicker and accomplish more in a shorter period of time. Efficient typing can make a world of difference for those wanting to pursue higher education.

Typewriting is formally assessed by means of a two-hour examination paper at two levels - Ordinary level and Higher level.

Higher level Typewriting saw the highest percentage of As in 2013, with 34.1 of the 85 students who sat the exam claiming full marks. In fact, nobody who sat the exam failed!


Course Outline
View / Download Typewriting Factsheet [pdf file]
View / Download full curriculum [pdf file]

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Junior Cycle Subjects  Junior Cycle Subjects
Leaving Cert Subjects  Leaving Cert Subjects

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