Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Julie Taggart from Lidl to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Julie Taggart

HR Coordinator

Lidl

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  Julie Taggart

The HR role is one that continually evolves. I would say that if you are considering this role you need to be able to adapt and embrace change easily.

In my opinion HR plays a positive and influential role in any company and good business acumen, knowledge and understanding of your people, policies and legislation are important.

It is vital that you have the ability to get on well with others as the role can involve resolving disputes and encouraging good relations in the workplace. Communication is key in this role and having the ability to keep a balanced and fair view of situations is a necessity. A rewarding role that continually inspires you to want to achieve more on a professional and personal level.

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Enterprising people like situations that involve using resources for personal or corporate economic gain. Such people may have an opportunistic frame of mind, and like commerce, trade and making deals. Some are drawn to sales and marketing occupations. Many will eventually end up owning their own business, or managing a section in larger organisations. They tend to be very goal-oriented, and work best when focused on a target. Some have an entrepreneurial inclination.
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School & College Education - <p>This section has information on Primary, Secondary and Third Level education in Ireland</p>
Primary Level - <p>This section has information on Pirmary School Education in Ireland</p>
Secondary Level - <p>This section has information on Secondary School Education in Ireland</p>
Third Level - <p>This section has information on Third Level Education in Ireland</p>
Fourth Level - <p>This section has information on postgraduate opportunities available in Ireland</p>
Adult Education - <p>This section has information on adult and continuing education, including PLC, professional, and short courses</p>

Marks Distribution 2013:
[View all subjects]
Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 2961 students who sat the Higher level Spanish exam in 2013.

Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 1942 students who sat the Ordinary level Spanish exam in 2013.

 
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Senior Cycle - Spanish

Subject Group: Humanities
These subjects explore the ways in which humans live and communicate in the world. Human life is examined by looking at our past, our present and into our future. These subjects help people to express themselves clearly and develop their reasoning ability.

Why study Spanish? Discover Spanish with Hector.

Why study Languages? Watch this Video to find out.

What is Spanish?

Spanish as a Leaving Cert subject aims to bring students closer to fluency in the Spanish language, as well as developing a good knowledge of literature, culture, and geography to provide a context for communication. As the second most natively spoken language and studied language on the planet, it has widespread use in international business and makes travel to Spain, Mexico, and most of South America more accessible.

What kind of student might Spanish suit?

  • Anyone with an interest in Spanish culture, history, and language.
  • Students interested in travelling the world.
  • Students who are considering working in Spain (or other Hispanic countries) or international relations in the future.

Career Possibilities

These are broad and include the IT industry, teaching, business, translation, the hospitality industry and tourism.

Leaving Certificate Exam Tips:

(1) Oral Examination (25%) the Spanish oral exam consists of two parts, personal questions and role-plays and typically last between 12 and 15 minutes depending on the student.

Part 1: The examiner will use personal questions to assess knowledge of tenses in the following order; present, past and future and/or conditional tenses. Make sure you respond in the correct tense. If you make a grammatical mistake or mispronounce something don't just keep talking. If you realise your mistake say sorry (Lo siento) and then what you meant to say. You will less likely be penalised for mistakes.

Part 2: this comes after the personal questions when the examiner asks a student one role-play from five prepared. Have fun with this and try avoid monotony, let the examiner know what you are feeling what you are saying by using intonation in your speech and eye contact. Don't spend the whole time looking at the sheet, rather try enjoy it and leave a positive impression.

(2) Listening Examination (20%) to do well in this the most important thing is to be prepared. A segment on the weather forecast always appears. Make this an area you know inside out. If you know the vocabularly it's easy marks. Do the listening comprehensions of previous years, this will help you get used to the process. Learning as much vocabulary is always useful to all parts of the Spanish exam.

(3) Written exam (55%) you will need a lot of vocabulary for the written exam. Make a note of the words that come up frequently and learn them off. Also, learn all the tenses and become familiar with the endings of different verbs, especially the irregular ones.

In this exam you will be asked to look within a comprehension piece for a Spanish sentence/phrase/word that is similar to a phrase they have given you. Have a look at the phrase and the tense it is written in - the phrase you are looking for in the text will normally be in the same tense so this will narrow down your search.

3rd Level Entry Requirements
This subject is a requirement for entry into a number of third level courses. Click on the link below to view courses that definitly requires, or may require this subject for entry:

CAO Entry Requirements [Source: Qualifax]

Note: Click on course titles to view the exact requirements for each course listed.




Data Sources: The information on these pages has been compiled from a variety of sources including the NCCA, Newbridge College / Brian Howard, Dept. of Education & Skills, and student interviews. Information in the 'People who took this subject' section reflects the views of those people interviewed on this website and is offered as informal and potentially useful information only.

While CareersPortal.ie attempts to keep this information as up to date and accurate as possible, we do not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of this information or decisions made on the basis of this information. Students should always discuss subject options with parents / guardians / guidance counsellors..
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People who took this subject... 4
Read what others say about their Leaving Cert. Subject Choices...
Psychologist - Clinical - Elaine MacDonald
Elaine MacDonald, St. Michael's House

I like the way that the Irish school system allows students to study a variety of subjects to get a broad base.

I chose a range of subjects including languages (French and Spanish) which allowed me to make friends and really immerse myself in different cultures during my summers abroad.

I feel that Maths helped me to develop my logical mind, and prepared me well for learning to use statistics which are widely used in Clinical Psychology.

Biology was certainly useful to take in school and is relevant to Clinical Psychology because of its focus on how the human body works and how the brain functions.

English was also useful to the role of Clinical Psychologist as report writing skills are used across the board, and good ability to express yourself both verbally and in writing is very important.

I also feel that my involvement in school sports (hockey and swimming) was important in helping me develop into a person who enjoys being part of a team.

 
 
Detective - Frank Keenaghan
Frank Keenaghan, An Garda Síochána English, Irish, French, Maths, Physics, Chemistry, History. I had no idea what I wanted to do when I chose the subjects I did. I am glad I chose Honours Irish as it enabled me to enter An Garda Síochána, and French as I feel having another language is important.

Perhaps I should have taken up another language like German or Spanish instead of the science subjects as I do not see the relevance of these subjects to my career. 
 
Franchisee - Elaine Steiro
Elaine Steiro, McDonald's

I took Art, Spanish, Business Studies & Home Economics.

I would say that they really didn't influence my career path, however, I did learn from my extra curricular activities that I liked working in groups and I could see how hard work paid off and was very fulfilling.

I would say that I would have liked more guidance and should have asked for more direction from people who could have pointed out my strengths to me earlier...

 
 
Mechanical Engineer - Damien Mason
Damien Mason, CRH plc

The subjects which I had control of choosing and which influenced my career path were:

Secondary School: Technical Graphics, Construction Studies, Engineering, Physics. These were an excellent base for my degree course in Mechanical Engineering in University.

University: Mechanical Engineering - choose fluids stream instead of solids stream half way through my degree course. In my current career, choosing the fluids stream has not had any significant bearing on my ability to perform my job.

If I had the choice in Secondary School, I would have chosen Spanish as a language to study. This allows a lot of extra opportunities to travel globally.

If I had the opportunity to change my choices in University, I would have done a years post grad in buisness studies and accounting after my degree in mechanical engineering. I belive this would have given me a competitive advantage in aspiring to a career in management.

 
 
  
 
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