Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked James Sheridan from Failte Ireland to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

James Sheridan

Restaurant Manager

Failte Ireland

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  James Sheridan

The best thing about this industry is you can get a job in the local hotel or restaurant, part time, and see if you like it.

Sit down with the manager and have a list of questions prepared. Don't make too many plans, just go with the flow, be nice/positive to everybody and things will go alright

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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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What do todays workers say about the subjects they chose when they did their Leaving Cert (or equivalent exam)?

Select workers from the list of Career Interviews to read what each person answered to the question "What subjects did you take in school and how have these influenced your career path?"

Elaine Dillon, STEPS


The subjects I took in school were: English, Irish, Maths, Physics, Music, Social and Scientific, History and  French. Having not realised until late in 5th year that I wanted to study engineering in college, I then took physics as an 8th subject at the minimum required pass level. As I had an interest in engineering and the right mindset, the pass physics course was relatively straight forward. As my wise physics teacher advised me, if I didn't enjoy the physics course I most likely would not enjoy engineering.

In hindsight, I should have chosen a science subject as part of my core subjects - all students should. But sometimes school timetables can simply not facilitate everybody's preferences and choices must be made - the important thing is to choose the subjects that are right for you. It is also important to note that it is not essential to have either science subjects or honours maths to achieve a degree in engineering. There are many routes of entry to suit all levels and skills. However, the important thing is to have an interest and enjoyment of these subjects in order to become a good engineer.