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New HEA Report Shows Computer Science Grads Snapped Up for Jobs

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New HEA Report Shows Computer Science Grads Snapped Up for Jobs


Wednesday, January 07, 2015 




New HEA Report Shows Computer Science Grads Snapped Up for Jobs

The HEA has published its report 'What do Graduates do?' - an analysis of where the class of 2013 ended up nine months after they graduated.

Key findings show that Computer Science students are most likely to be snapped up by employers after graduation - they are also likely to earn more.

Some 77% of Computer Science graduates with an honours bachelor degree (level 8) were in employment nine months after graduation. This success rate was followed by Education at 76%, and Health and Welfare at 73%.

Of those computer science graduates in employment, six out of seven were based in the State – indicating the strength of the tech sector here. However, there has been a marked shift towards overseas employment among graduates intending to go into teaching, nursing and other healthcare professions.

Among level 8 health and welfare graduates, the employment rate here dropped from 63% in 2012 to 51% last year, while the employment rate overseas rose from 14% to 21%. Among graduates with an honours bachelor degree in education, the employment rate in the State dropped from 86% in 2012 to 68% last year, while the employment rate overseas rose from 6% to 16%.

Just 36% of Arts and Humanities graduates were in employment. Half of this cohort were engaged in further studies or training. Arts and humanities graduates who did find employment, placed little value on the relevance of their degrees. Just 32% said their education was relevant or most relevant to their employment, while 49% said it was irrelevant or most irrelevant.

In contrast, 74% of Computer Science graduates in employment, and 84% of working graduates in Agriculture and Veterinary as well as Health and Welfare, said their education was relevant or most relevant to their employment.

Download the HEA 'What do Graduates do? report here.

Full Article: irishtimes.ie

The CareersPortal Team