Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Val Gabriel from Hewlett-Packard to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Val Gabriel

Product Manager

Hewlett-Packard

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  Val Gabriel

Good analytical skills. Be able to hear 200 individual pieces of information. Discard the 175 that have no bearing, and then tie the 25 pieces together into a compiling decision/path forward.

Patience: Not everything happens at the speed you would like. Push hard, don’t be afraid to voice your position, but know when to be patient. For this job you have to have an honest and real feel for customers. Who they are, what they want, where they buy, how much they spend, this allows you to target their needs better. The classic win/win, customer gets their needs fulfilled better and your company has a winning product.

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Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Hotels plan to train the unemployed  


Wednesday, March 07, 2012 




Hotels plan to train the unemployed

A PLAN to train up to 3,000 long-term unemployed people for jobs in the hospitality sector is being put forward by the Irish Hotels Federation.

Incoming president of the federation Michael Vaughan said the hospitality sector faced a shortage of trained craft and entry-level workers such as breakfast chefs, bar staff, porters and chamber assistants.

After his election at the federation’s annual conference in Kilkenny yesterday, Mr Vaughan called on the Government to set up training schemes – similar to those previously run by Fáilte Ireland – to cater for the industry’s annual intake of bartenders, chefs, porters, waiters and chamber assistants.

The scheme would reintroduce unemployed people to “real work” while improving the skill levels of “unprepared” hospitality staff, he said. Mr Vaughan said the federation also wanted some of the State’s hotels which close for the winter months to be hired out “at basic rates” to be used as training centres.

He had already put the idea to Minister for Tourism Leo Varadkar who attended the conference this week. Mr Vaughan said Mr Varadkar expressed a willingness to consider the proposal. Mr Vaughan said the federation would be happy to take part in local skills-needs surveys with employment exchanges to determine the levels of participation. “It could be set up on a local basis, using the federation’s branch network and it could provide jobs-training for regeneration areas such as Roxboro [in Limerick],” he said.

Similarly, he said, specialist training could improve the abilities of porters and bar staff, chamber assistants and others. “Very often these people are the first points of contact with the Irish for the visitor,” he said. Federation members traditionally take on some 3,000 such staff annually, some of them for seasonal work. Part of the proposal is that staff would be given a “skills pass” which would be a certification system to show they had been trained.

Tim O'Brien, The Irish Times
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What are your Career Interests? 897

Creative
Creative
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.

 Go... Explore Career Interests here...