Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elaine MacDonald from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Elaine MacDonald

Psychologist - Clinical

St. Michael's House

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  Elaine MacDonald

Make sure you are willing to go the full distance in terms of the time needed to train as a Clinical Psychologist – it’s typically at least six years academic study, and invariably this period is interspersed with work in a relevant field.

Do be as confident as you can that you’re happy being a “listener” and “observer”, as you will spend significant amounts of time in your work life as a Clinical Psychologist being in this role, as well as being in the “do-er” role and being in the limelight.

To have a good ‘fit’ with this career you’ll need to be happy working with people – as individuals on a one to one basis, with groups (e.g. families), and as part of a team in the workplace.

You need to have a good attention to detail as the job needs good observation skills, record keeping, and organisation skills.

Be prepared for learning and self-development to be on-going for the whole of your career because, as a Clinical Psychologist, you’ll be learning and using techniques and intervention approaches that are being constantly developed, and be working in accordance with policies and laws that are also constantly evolving.

The last piece of advice I’d give to someone considering this job is to be as sure as you can that you feel comfortable and even excited at the prospect of your career revolving around people and groups with all the varied, diverse, and unpredictable rewards and challenges that this brings!

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Administrative 
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Parents urged to fight guidance cuts 


Wednesday, April 11, 2012 




Parents urged to fight guidance cuts

TEACHERS have called on parents to become more active in the fight to save guidance counsellor roles in schools.

At its annual conference in Cork yesterday, the Association of Secondary Teachers in Ireland (ASTI) said that the most vulnerable students would be let down by the axeing of guidance counselling. From September, career guidance counsellors will be included in the number of teachers allocated to a school.

Up until now they have not been included in the school's teacher quota. Teachers claim that in order to cope with the guidance counsellor being part of the allocated staff, they would lose another teacher, and therefore subjects would be dropped.

Kevin Brogan of the Drogheda Sean Higgins branch called on the National Parents' Council and the Joint Management Board to take a more active role in opposing the changes. "As a parent, I would be horrified if this happened at my child's school because the bottom line is that a subject will be lost," he said.

The ASTI also claims the cuts will lead to an increase in early school dropouts.

Majella O'Sullivan, Irish Independent, 11/4/2012
Full article

 




Show Respect For Authority

  

We all have to answer to other people. By the nature of their authority, position, and power, we need to show respect to these people.

            
 

What are your Career Interests? 887

Realist
Realist
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.

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