Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Fergus O'Connell from BioPharmachem Ireland to give some advice for people considering this job:


Fergus O'Connell

Quality Officer

BioPharmachem Ireland

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  Fergus O'Connell
A broad science background is very important. An ability to recognise small inconsistencies is equally important. For example do you recognise small discrepancies between different camera shots of the same scene in films and TV series?

An ability to question everything and think laterally is important. Also the ability to say 'no' (not everyone is comfortable doing this). Working in quality is not about being popular and definitely not about being a tyrant but one needs to be approachable, consistent and have good interpersonal skills.

Not all of your decisions are going to be popular but they need to be based on a sound rationale and you need to be able to support them. One also needs to be acutely aware of the fact that your opinion won't always be right.

One must always be open to being convinced of an alternative argument.

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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@ School - Junior Cycle Subjects

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Junior Cycle - CSPE

Subject Group: Social
These subjects explore common issues faced by all people living in society. They develop the skills and knowledge used to manage personal resources and guide human behaviour.

Brief Description:

Civic, Social and Political Education (CSPE) is taught to all Junior Certificate students. It aims to help you to become actively involved in your community, your country and the wider world.

How will CSPE be useful to me?

At the moment, there is no subject called CSPE after the Junior Cert. However, a Leaving Certificate subject called Politics and Society is likely to be introduced in the future. What you have learned in CSPE will be useful if you study Geography, Home Economics, History or Economics in the Leaving Cert.

Note: The current CSPE course will be assessed for the final year in 2016. For students beginning post primary education in September 2014, citizenship education will be a new, short course.

View / Download CSPE Factsheet [pdf file]
View / Download full curriculum [pdf file]
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