Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Enterprising people like situations that involve using resources for personal or corporate economic gain. Such people may have an opportunistic frame of mind, and like commerce, trade and making deals. Some are drawn to sales and marketing occupations. Many will eventually end up owning their own business, or managing a section in larger organisations. They tend to be very goal-oriented, and work best when focused on a target. Some have an entrepreneurial inclination.
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New JCSA Programme
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New JCSA Programme

The new 'Junior Cycle Student Award' (JCSA) programme commenced delivery in schools in September 2014.

The main points of significance in relation to the new JCSA programme are:

  • A cap  on the total number of subjects taken at Junior Certificate Level to eight
  • Potential for Short Courses in 16 new areas including: Chinese Language & Culture; Leadership; Web Design
  • Revised Assessment arrangements
  • 24 Statements of Learning
  • Focus on 8 Key Skills to be embedded in the learning outcomes and appropriate to the age of the learner

The key skills of Junior Cycle are:

Students starting Junior Cert in 2014

Students who commenced first year in post-primary school in September 2014 are taking part in the new JCSA.

The new programme is designed to help students as they grow up in a different and changing world and to face the future with confidence and belief in themselves.  In 2014, students will study a new course in English and might also take some new short courses, if the school they attent opts to include them in their programme. 

During the three years of Junior Cycle, students will learn in a wide variety of ways and there will be a strong emphasis on key skills, literacy and numeracy.

Students will get more detailed reports on their progress in junior cycle. The reports will look at how well they are doing in literacy and numeracy, and they will also be asked to comment on their own progress before the report is sent to their parents or guardian.

The big change is in the examinations. There will still be an examination at the end of junior cycle, in English for example (which is the first revised programme to be rolled-out), 40% of the marks will now be for work done before the JCSA exam, in second and third year. So, not everything will depend on how students do in the final JCSA exam.

The New JCSA English Syllabus is available here.

In 2017, when JCSA students come to the end of third year, they will be examined in six to eight subjects, depending on the number of short courses that have been taken. These will include the new course in English, other new courses taken and any other Junior Certificate subjects the student is studying – all up to a limit of eight.

At the end of third year, students will receive a new qualification called the National Certificate of Junior Cycle Education.

Detailed information on the new JCSA is available here.

 





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