Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Catherine Day from EU Careers to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Catherine Day

Secretary General

EU Careers

Read more

  Catherine Day
I would advise them to give it a go - it doesn’t mean you have to work there long term. You must know how to speak a language other than your mother tongue reasonably well, as a good proficiency is essential. It’s also important to know and understand the cultural diversity that makes up the European Union.

Our internships are a great chance to come for a short period to determine where your interests lie and taste the experiences. Starting out your career path with the EU gives you a really good foundation of insider knowledge of how the EU works and is so useful professionally, even if you don’t plan on working there forever.

It is also important for young Irish people to consider moving to countries that are not English speaking and working for the EU would be very useful to your long term career.
Close

Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
All Courses
PLC Progression Routes
PLC Points Calculator
CAO Points Calculator
CAO Video Guide

Templemore College of Further Education 
DIT 
Ballyhaise Agricultural College 
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation
New JCSA Programme
Sub Menu menu button
logo imagelogo image

New JCSA Programme

The new 'Junior Cycle Student Award' (JCSA) programme commenced delivery in schools in September 2014.

The main points of significance in relation to the new JCSA programme are:

  • A cap  on the total number of subjects taken at Junior Certificate Level to eight
  • Potential for Short Courses in 16 new areas including: Chinese Language & Culture; Leadership; Web Design
  • Revised Assessment arrangements
  • 24 Statements of Learning
  • Focus on 8 Key Skills to be embedded in the learning outcomes and appropriate to the age of the learner

The key skills of Junior Cycle are:

Students starting Junior Cert in 2014

Students who commenced first year in post-primary school in September 2014 are taking part in the new JCSA.

The new programme is designed to help students as they grow up in a different and changing world and to face the future with confidence and belief in themselves.  In 2014, students will study a new course in English and might also take some new short courses, if the school they attent opts to include them in their programme. 

During the three years of Junior Cycle, students will learn in a wide variety of ways and there will be a strong emphasis on key skills, literacy and numeracy.

Students will get more detailed reports on their progress in junior cycle. The reports will look at how well they are doing in literacy and numeracy, and they will also be asked to comment on their own progress before the report is sent to their parents or guardian.

The big change is in the examinations. There will still be an examination at the end of junior cycle, in English for example (which is the first revised programme to be rolled-out), 40% of the marks will now be for work done before the JCSA exam, in second and third year. So, not everything will depend on how students do in the final JCSA exam.

The New JCSA English Syllabus is available here.

In 2017, when JCSA students come to the end of third year, they will be examined in six to eight subjects, depending on the number of short courses that have been taken. These will include the new course in English, other new courses taken and any other Junior Certificate subjects the student is studying – all up to a limit of eight.

At the end of third year, students will receive a new qualification called the National Certificate of Junior Cycle Education.

Detailed information on the new JCSA is available here.

 





"I'm already doing it!"


Hint: BioPharmachem Ireland

Who said this? Find out here: go


Watch Careers Videos... 113

Steven Kilgannon - An Garda Síochána
Garda Trainee     

Mark Spain  - An Garda Síochána
Garda Trainee     

Jack McGovern - An Garda Síochána
Garda Trainee