Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Kevin Keary from EU Careers to give some advice for people considering this job:


Kevin Keary

Parliamentary Assistant

EU Careers

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  Kevin Keary
Be proactive and look for the areas that interest you whether it’s the Environment or Human Rights and find MEP’s or interest groups that specialise in those interests and take the initiative to send them your CV.

Having a European language would help you considerably in this career. Irish should also not be ruled out as an option as this is considered as a second language.

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Growing your Skills

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Growing your Skills

The focus on activities in TY offers a great chance to develop the sort of life skills that really matter as you grow older.

Skills are learnt by doing - this means they develop over time while actively doing something. You can't learn lifeskills from a book, no more than you can learn to drive a car by just reading about it.

So, a number of TY modules usually involve activities with your classmates, where you have to work together as a group, sharing out different tasks and responsibilities, and discussing how things should be done. Through these activities you have the opportunity to develop what are known as 'soft' skills - those skills that enable people to get along together and produce good work efficiently.

These 'soft' skills are also known as career skills for the same reason - they are the skills that are needed by all people in the workplace in order for them to do their job well. We encourage you to explore what these skills are during your TY in general, and in your work experience in particular.

Fact: you can get all A's in your Leaving cert or college degree, but if you are not able to communicate well, or work comfortably in a team, you won't get the job.

Employers regard career skills as equally important to qualifications - so developing career skills is actually incredibly important for your future career.

Explore Career Skills here

From the age of 8 I knew that I wanted to be a chef and not just any type of chef but the best I could, and when I finished school I applied to Failte Ireland to become a chef which was called C.E.R.T. at the time. After finishing my 2-year-course there I got the opportunity to work in Germany with some fantastic chefs who showed how to enjoy the passion of cooking which I always had. This was one of the biggest career milestones, if not the greatest. The time that I spent in Germany has always stayed with me and made me want more and more from this business.

Hint: Failte Ireland

Who said this? Find out here: go