Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tracey Roche from Analog Devices to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Tracey Roche

Design Engineer

Analog Devices

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  Tracey Roche

3 main things:

1. Be organised.

2. Try to keep a positive attitude.

3. Persevere. Working in a Design Evaluation role or indeed any electronic engineering role, requires problem-solving skills and half the battle with this is having a positive attitude. If you have a negative/pessimistic attitude, the battle to find a solution is lost before you even start. In debugging an issue, start with the basics and work from there. Like peeling an onion, gradually peel off the outter layers to reveal the inner core of the onion...as you work, you get more clues and develop a better understanding of the product/issue you are working on.

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Administrative?
Administrative 
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Tourism & Hospitality
Tourism & Hospitality
CIT Tourism and Hospitality Department



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This course is the perfect learning for a career in the wide world of cookery and food preparation, particularly for those who want to be a professional chef. Grade D3 at Ordinary Level in five subjects including English or Irish. Mathematics must be passed at Grade D3 ordinary or Grade B2 at Foundation Level or better.


 

The course is designed to meet the skills requirements of students who wish to pursue careers within the hospitality sector. The graduates typically work in contact with the customer, in restaurants and bar operations or associated areas such as conference and banqueting.


 

This course puts a focus firmly on management skills for the catering industry. It includes topics such as statistics, information technology, food and beverage operations, reception, accommodation operations, business administration, sales and marketing, law, accounting and French/German.


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