Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elva Bannon from Smart Futures to give some advice for people considering this job:


Elva Bannon

Mechatronic Engineer

Smart Futures

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  Elva Bannon

I found having education in a number of different areas of engineering to be beneficial to the work I am doing.

There is a whole world of possibilities out there for engineers, and it is difficult to know what subjects are necessary for the industry you will end up in. I was always interested in robotics and environmental issues, but it was not until my Masters that I really knew what I wanted to do.

General entry courses are quite useful, as you get a taste for a few different areas before you have to specialise, a lot of companies offer on the job training, and there is also the possibility of further study.

An engineering qualification teaches you so much more than just the technical subjects, but a way of looking at the world and solving problems in a logical and systematic way.

Engineers are sought after for these skills as much as the technical ones, and it opens up incredible opportunities. Engineering is not an easy route through college, but it is incredibly rewarding.


Enterprising people like situations that involve using resources for personal or corporate economic gain. Such people may have an opportunistic frame of mind, and like commerce, trade and making deals. Some are drawn to sales and marketing occupations. Many will eventually end up owning their own business, or managing a section in larger organisations. They tend to be very goal-oriented, and work best when focused on a target. Some have an entrepreneurial inclination.
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UL Computer Games Development - Overview

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This is one of three follow on options from LM121 Computing Technologies (Common Entry).

This programme will equip you with the skills and technological ability to develop both Computer Game and computer graphic related systems. You will study Computer Science, with special emphasis on topics relevant to Game Design such as software development, mobile devices, computer graphics and artificial intelligence. You will also study topics relevant to development of a game concept to the final “shooting script” (prior to programming).

The key aims of the B.Sc. (Hons) in Computer Games Development programme are to provide you with:

  • Knowledge of the various programming languages and related platforms.
  • Skills in System Analysis, and integration of software components.
  • Expertise in areas such as the human computer interface and artificial intelligence which will enable you to develop software for an array of computer graphics and computer games domains.

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