Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Cosmin Tudor from McDonald's to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Cosmin Tudor

Restaurant Manager

McDonald's

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  Cosmin Tudor
You would need to to be patient, have perseverance and have good people skills.
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Administrative?
Administrative 
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.

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At a Glance... header image

Space Science and Technology

For many people, a career in the space industry means the exciting job of becoming an astronaut and making trips to outer space, but this futuristic sector contains a lot more opportunities.

The space industry is dominated by scientists and engineers who want to play a part in the growing space science and technology sector. On offer is a vast array of opportunities that cover many different specialist disciplines, while behind the scenes, there are also a substantial number of managers, administrators and technical service staff.



Science and Engineering roles in the space industry cover a wide range of specialisations: mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, communications and systems engineers.

Mechanical and materials engineers develop the 'hardware' required for space science and exploration. This would include the equipment and technology needed. 

Electronic or systems engineers develop the 'software' that is essential to run this equipment and ensure that they are working correctly.

Mathematics is at the core of a number of roles, especially in the analysis of the large amounts of data produced by space instruments and in calculating the orbits of space vehicles.

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Ireland is a member of the European Space Agency (ESA) and has a large role to play in the space programmes of Europe. 

The ESA, along with partner Irish companies, provide numerous exciting opportunities to work in the space sector.

Read 'Ireland's Space Endeavours' from Enterprise Ireland.

Irish companies take part in numerous European wide space programmes involving all areas of space science and technology. The space sector here employs over 1,000 people and this is expected to increase with the number of companies in the Irish space market likely to grow in the coming years. Surprisingly, the space industry is one of the few industries in Ireland which has continued to grow, despite recent economic circumstances.


Space Science header image

There are many specialised fields in which a person who is interested in space can embark, and have an exciting and challenging career.

Space Science is the study of everything in outer space. It includes astrophysics and planetary science.

Astrophysics is related to astronomy and focuses on the physics of the universe. It involves studying the planets, stars, moons and other celestial objects in order to understand the universe and make new discoveries.

Planetary Science is the study of planetary systems across the Solar System and beyond, examining planetary magnetospheres, moon interactions, surfaces and comets.

The space industry is dominated by scientists and engineers who want to play a part in the growing space science and technology sector. On offer is a vast array of opportunities that cover many different specialist disciplines. Behind the scenes, there are also substantial numbers of managers, administrators and technical service staff.

The majority of employees working in this field have an undergraduate degree, and many have studied at postgraduate level.

Typically, workers have STEM backgrounds - in Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths, or a qualification in a related area, such as law or business is also desired. 

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Earth Observation & Environment header image

Earth observation and environment is about gaining a better understanding of the earth, its composition, how it functions, and the effects that human behaviour can cause.

Integral to this area is the examination of the effects of climate change, pollution, over-use of natural resources, and how these issues can be tackled. Scientists use data from Earth observation satellites to monitor global and regional changes in the environment, as well as to learn more about the Earth system and improve predictions of future environmental conditions.

Scientists here work in areas such as atmospheric science, environmental chemistry, ecology, and geoscience. The sector requires skills in physical and mathematical EO algorithms, data assimilation into models and in the comparison of EO data and models.
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Life Sciences header image

The study of plants, human beings, animals and other living organisms, make up what is known as the life sciences, which describe living organisms, their internal processes, and their relationship to each other and the environment.

The life sciences include Biology, Botany and Zoology. Research areas in the life sciences span such areas as biochemistry, cell biology, cognitive neuroscience, ecology, genetics, health sciences, medicine, and microbiology, among others.

The physical sciences on the other hand, include areas such as chemistry - physical chemistry, theoretical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, etc; earth sciences such as: geology, soil science, meteorology, and physics.

These fields of natural and physical science have specific degree programmes available. If you love science and mathematics, then this could be the ideal career area for you.

Based around the subject of biology, the life sciences strive to find a better understanding of living things, both on earth, and possibly beyond.

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Technology header image

Launching a satellite into space to orbit the earth, or a probe to visit another celestial body, remains a huge challege for space science, despite the major progress that has been achieved in recent decades. 

Several families of rockets have been developed (i.e. Soyuz, Ariane, Atlas, Delta) and satellites have become the essential platform for space research. They are launched into different orbits, depending on their mission - to function as communication, earth observation, navigation or positioning technologies.

Space technology is the area where the tools and equipment required to explore the far reaches of the universe are developed. For example, spacecraft structures, mechanisms, and launcher propulsion, thermal control technology, environment control, life support technology, robotics and optics. 

This is an innovative and exciting career area. It is at the cutting edge of new technologies. New developments in information technologies, computing power and molecular research into materials are all contributing to rapidly advancing these technologies. Manufacturing technology for the sector is leaping forward with developments such as 3D printing or 'Additive manufacturing' which is currently under study in several space agencies and related industrial producers. These technologies have been tested in the space sector to produce models and prototypes. Space agencies and industry are looking at integrating these capacities into industrial processes, testing different metal alloys to build parts and create new equipment.

Technologies are usually developed to respond to specific needs. However, once they are developed, they may have multiple uses. Over the years, technologies developed in the space sector have found their way into sectors as diverse as health and medicine, transportation, manufacturing practices and materials, and computer technologies. For example, air purification systems in hospital intensive care wards started out as space technologies; radar surveying of tunnel rock is now used to improve safety for miners; enhanced materials developed for use in space are now used in a variety of sporting products, from racing yachts, to sports shoes. Ultrasound and cardiac imaging both derived from camera technologies onboard NASA earth survey satellites.

Developers work on increasingly complex system architectures. Whole new classes of missions for navigation, communications, remote sensing and scientific research for both civilian and military purposes, are being designed in universities, research centres and industry.

All of these developments bring together a diverse range of skills and qualifications. This is an attractive career sector for people who are curious, creative and inventive and who like excitement and innovation. The sector is home to many highly-skilled professionals, mainly technicians, scientists and engineers.

The range of technology disciplines required can be quite wide, depending on the specific area of activity - mechanical, mechatronic electronic, electrical, biomedical, communications and software engineering, as well as basic science subjects such as physics, chemistry, biology and maths - all are valuable skills in this area.

Applied Mathematics & Data Processing

Careers in the space sector utilise the skill of mathematical analysis in a practical environment, to identify problems and engineer solutions in space programme development. This is necessary to support the work of all divisions in the Space Science and Technology sector to ensure the smooth running of every project.

Science and Engineering roles in the space industry cover a wide range of specialisations, for example, mechanical, electrical, communications and systems engineers. Mechanical and materials engineers develop the hardware required for space science and exploration. This would include the equipment and technology needed. 

Electronic or systems engineers develop the software that is essential to run this equipment and ensure that they are working correctly. Mathematics is at the core of a number of roles, especially in the analysis of the large amounts of data produced by space instruments and in calculating the orbits of space vehicles.

The space sector is a technology intensive industry, and the work that is carried out is highly specialised. Companies in Ireland are involved in the areas of electronics, aerospace, structures, materials, hardware and software, all of which are integral components needed for space programmes. 

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Total Records: 6
Name
Full Address
Phone Number
Forfás, Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2
(01) 607 3184
East Point Business Park, Dublin, 3.
(01) 727 2000
Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin, 2.
(01) 607 3200
www.esa.int/Services/Contacts
Confederation House, 84/86, Lower Baggot Street, Dublin, 2.
(01) 605 1500
Shannon Airport, Shannon, Co. Clare.
(061) 370 000

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