Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Oisin Murphy from Construction Industry Federation to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Oisin Murphy

Apprentice Carpenter

Construction Industry Federation

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  Oisin	Murphy
Oisín:
Be as open to advice and teaching as possible. Craft your own methods and ways of doing things and always continue to learn and devlop yourself and your skills.

Daniel:
You need to enjoy working with your hands.
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Media & Publishing

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Media & Publishing

Our ever-increasing appetite for news, information and entertainment ensures that the media and those working in the media play an important role in our lives. This sector encompasses the areas of film and television broadcasting, radio, journalism, print media, new media, and music publishing among others. It is regulated by the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland (BAI) and the Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland (ASAI). 

Work in the media business is very competitive and in high demand. A degree is not always necessary for entry to the area, but a relevant qualification will give you the edge.

Working in this field is not easy - it is often on a freelance or short term basis, with looming deadlines and odd hours, but it is an exciting and varied career sector to consider. Many jobs in this sector require early starts and late finishes, day, evening, night and weekend working. Long hours may be required to meet deadlines. While some workers are based in offices, studios or print shops, others may be required to travel frequently and work outside in all weather conditions.

Creativity is the essential skill for many jobs in this sector. Communication skills, the ability to work well in a team, IT skills and confidence are also likely to be important.


Film, TV & Broadcasting header image

FILM, TV and BROADCASTING

The Irish Film and Television sector is broad and varied. It includes the production, broadcast and distribution of feature films, animation, TV drama, documentaries, news and current affairs, light entertainment, children's programmes and advertising. An equally broad and varied range of careers exist:

Film making 
This is the process of making a film, from an initial story idea or commission through scriptwriting, shooting, editing and finally distribution to an audience. Typically it involves a large number of people in diverse occupations and can take anywhere between a few months and several years to complete. [click here for an overview of the process (from www.skillset.org)]

The film industry is high-profile but surprisingly small and therefore extremely competitive to get into. One of the first steps is to explore the diverse job roles that are available, then pursue this in whatever way is appropriate. Check on the Sample careers for details on individual roles. Further information on film in Ireland can be found from the Irish Film Board.


Check out the Film Production Department guide from Screen Training Ireland to learn more about the kind of skills required and career opportunities available in film.

Animation
Animation is currently the star performer of the Irish TV and Film Industry. The sector is going through what one major player calls a "golden age", winning contracts with the big international networks and production companies and causing great concern for the traditional powerhouses of the cartoon industry.  

Irish studios such as Brown BagJam Media and Boulder have all been snapping up talented young Irish animators almost as soon as they graduate from dedicated courses at the Irish School of Animation (ISA), Ballyfermot College and IADT in Dun Laoghaire. Traditional players in the UK, such as Aardman Studios (Wallace & Gromit) and Ragdoll Productions (Teletubbies) are concerned that competition from Ireland and elsewhere could spell "terminal decline" for their animation industry.

Ireland's fame, as a hub for the design of software, games and animation has been further consolidated with the 2010 Oscar successes of animator and visual effects artist,Richard Baneham, for his work on the film Avatar, and Kilkenny based animation studio Cartoon Saloon for The Secret of Kells.

Routes into animation are increasing, with courses now being offered at Limerick IT (Tipperary) and Letterkenny IT, as well as IADT Dunlaoighre and ISA in Ballyfermot College. Explore available animation courses from Level 5-8 in the PLC and CAO course menus [right].

Broadcast Television 
Television is still the medium of our age, although the internet is catching up fast. It reaches millions of people in an instant in the intimacy of their own home. TV supplies most people with the bulk of their daily entertainment, with most of their information about the world, and arguably with most of their views and opinions.

As digital TV is the latest wave of technology to sweep the industry, more opportunities for broadcasters will become available. Opportunities exist as TV presenters alongside the many technical roles that are required to ensure a show runs smoothly. Information on some of the many careers in TV can be found from the list on the left (from FÁS Career Directions)

RTÉ is the public service broadcaster in Ireland and the main employer in this sector, with approximately 2,000 staff on the RTÉ campus. Job opportunities for RTÉ, TG4 and TV3 are advertised on their respective websites and in the national press. Positions for Irish speaking presenters and supporting staff in TnaG and supporting film making companies are frequently in short supply.

RADIO
In common with all creative media today, Radio is going through a period of major change, due to the challenges and opportunities being posed by digital technology. The radio industry needs creative and talented people to respond to these challenges and to fill a range of interesting and varied roles. Current and emerging career areas in radio include: digital and social media, writing and producing, researching, on-air broadcasting, and sales and marketing.

Getting into Radio happens by various routes. A Degree in Communications or Media Production is one way. Some entrants work their way up from entry level roles, others gain voluntary experience in community or hospital radio. Presenters may be recruited for their specialist knowledge of an area e.g sport or politics gained from a background in that industry or a related area of media.

Reporters, presenters and correspondents usually need to have a degree in either communications or journalism, although at times employers will consider those who have non-media type qualifications. Writers and those working in media research would usually need to have a degree in literature, journalism, communications, or English.

The education needed for jobs in the media industry is dependent on your chosen career area, but many of these jobs will require that you have a Level 7/8 Degree. The various technicians in this field will need to have specialised training to deal with the technical equipment that is used in media broadcasting today. 

Employers in this area are interested in individuals who have a particular experience or knowledge in a chosen field. Training opportunities include on-the-job training. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) may be necessary to keep up to date with new technology. Freelancers must fund their own training. 

Many careers have no formal promotional structure, but experienced workers may be able to progress to more senior roles.
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Publishing header image

PUBLISHING

Ireland has a thriving publishing sector which includes:
  • Newspapers and magazines - researching, writing, editing and illustrating news stories and features on a huge range of local, national and international topics
  • Books - producing fiction and non-fiction titles on an enormous range of subjects
  • Photography - producing images that tell a story or record an event
  • Print - making hard-copy products that include books, newspapers, magazines, greeting cards, brochures and office stationery
Newspapers
Over 5.2 million newspapers are sold every week in Ireland, and a further 1.5 million distributed free of charge. Some 4,000 people are employed in the industry, including over 2,000 editorial staff. A large pool of freelance journalists also play an important part in the newspaper industry and countless others work in areas closely aligned with the industry. 

However, daily newspapers have seen circulation decline by up to 15% in the past year, a factor attributed to the economic downturn, and to developments in digital media alternatives. The availability of news online and through mobile devices has challenged the role of the traditional newspaper.  Several Irish newspapers now have an online presence as well as their print version, and some have developed mobile apps for smartphones and tablets. 

There are few new entrants to the  traditional newspaper sector now, but new opportunities are opening up as digital skills are required. There will always be an audience for news, and newspapers will have to continue changing and adapting to the digital world. 

Magazines

Careers in the sector include:  Publishers, Editors, Journalists, Designers, Advertising Managers, Credit Managers and related administration roles. There are over 1,250 people directly employed in the magazine industry in Ireland, and a further 4,500 jobs, such as freelance journalists, photographers and models, reliant on the sector.  Every year, 50 million magazines are bought in Ireland, 10 million of which are Irish.

The sector depends largely on income from advertising revenue. Like all media, it too has been hugely impacted by the economic climate, but more so by digital technology. One view is that the magazine industry definitely has a future, just not on paper! The industry must evolve and embrace digital media forms. This opens up opportunities for those with the appropriate qualifications and skill set.

Book Publishing
There are about 140 book publishing companies in Ireland, and most have only a few permanent staff. To get a book published, one would usually find a publisher that is receptive to what you have written. This would then be evaluated by a 'Series editor' who would then pass it on to a 'Commissioning editor' to see if would be commercially viable to produce. If all goes well, you could get a publishing contract after a few months. At this stage, the book needs to be written. 

Once written, the Publishing house will normally do the typesetting, design and printing, much of which is outsourced. Recently, writers have had the opportunity to get their book printed and published directly from online services, e.g. www.lulu.com

Jobs within the publishing sector offer exciting possibilities, but it is important to realise that this sector is very competitive and you would need to be prepared. Work experience is a valuable asset as it demonstrates a hands-on interest and shows that you have what it takes to do the job.

Determination is the key to success. Those who manage to break into the publishing sector aren't just the most creative or talented - they're generally the most determined, taking the attitude that 'if at first you don't succeed, try again'. You'll have to persevere and remain optimistic if you want to realise your dream of becoming a famous actress or even the next Steven Spielberg.

New Media
New Media has become a significant element in everyday life. It allows people to communicate, bank, shop and entertain. The global network of the Internet, for instance, connects people and information via computers. In this way the Internet, overcomes the gap between people from different countries, permitting them to exchange opinions and information. Diverse means for this exist even within the context of the internet, including chat rooms, instant messaging applications, wiki sites, forums, email messaging, online video and audio streaming and downloads, and voice-over-internet telecommunications (VOIP). 

New Media is defined not only as a communication tool, but also as a tool for the commercial exchange of goods and services. Consumer goods are for sale, and personal property may be auctioned, through the Internet. New media workers play an integral part in the development and design of content. Working on the cutting-edge of what's new and exciting, they create an interactive mix of text, graphics, photography, video, animation and sound. 

Music Publishing
Music Publishing is a skilled service provided to the songwriter by a music publisher to help create and promote a song or music piece. The music publishers job is to make as much money as possible for both the songwriter and him/herself as possible by 'exploiting' the songs controlled to their full potential. A fee is usually charged in the form of a percentage of the songs earnings being retained by the publisher for his/her services. Hence the split between songwriter and publisher is the first thing to be decided. This can range from a 50/50 split to a 60/40, 70/30 etc, the higher percentage always in favour of the writer. Other main points to be negotiated will be the term or length of the contract, the songs it covers, the territories it applies to (UK & Ireland, USA, Japan, The World, etc) and when payments are to be made.

The most exciting aspect to life as a Music Publisher is that things change rapidly. A style of music currently popular can become outmoded almost overnight. Copyright matters such as Internet usage etc. also bring new challenges and one must be constantly aware of and adaptable to these changes. [see IMRO for more details]

GETTING INTO MEDIA AND PUBLISHING

Many jobs in this sector require early starts and late finishes, day, evening, night and weekend working. Long hours may be required to meet deadlines. While some workers are based in offices, studios or print shops, others may be required to travel frequently and work outside in all weather conditions. 

Creativity is the essential skill for many jobs in this sector. Communication skills, the ability to work well in a team, IT skills and confidence are also likely to be important. 

The education needed for jobs in the media industry is dependent on your chosen career, but many of these jobs will require that you have Level 7/8 Degrees. The various technicians in this field will need to have specialised training to deal with the technical equipment that is used in media broadcasting today. 

Reporters, presenters and correspondents usually need to have a degree in either communications or journalism, although at times employers will consider those who have non-media type qualifications. Writers and those working in media research would usually need to have a degree in literature, journalism, communications, or English. 

Employers in this area are particularly interested in individuals who have a particular experience or knowledge in a chosen field. Training opportunities include on-the-job training. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) may be necessary to keep up to date with new technology. Freelancers must fund their own training. 

Many careers have no formal promotional structure, but experienced workers may be able to progress to more senior roles.
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Journalism header image

JOURNALISM

The news and broadcast industries in Ireland have traditionally been the two main sources of employment for journalists, alongside print. Content written by journalists is published via newspapers and magazines (print), television and radio (broadcast), and the digital media versions of these — news websites and applications.

Journalism is said to act as a watchdog on the workings of the government and policy, however, there different forms of journalism, targeted at diverse audiences:
  • Advocacy journalism – writing to advocate particular viewpoints or influence the opinions of the audience
  • Broadcast journalism – written or spoken journalism for radio or television
  • Drone journalism – use of drones to capture journalistic footage
  • Investigative journalism - the use of investigation on a subject matter while uncovering news events
  • Photojournalism -  the telling of a story through its images
  • Tabloid journalism – writing that is light-hearted and entertaining
  • Yellow journalism (or sensationalism) – writing which emphasises exaggerated claims or rumours. 
The world of media and journalism is changing, driven by the spread of digital technology. The rise of social media has resulted in arguments to reconsider journalism.

New forms of journalism are emerging such as blogging and citizen journalism. From this perspective, journalism is participatory - a process distributed among multiple authors and involving journalists as well as members of the public.

The mass media has undergone profound changes in the last 20 years - digital technology and the publication of news on the Internet has changed value of print media. People increasingly access news through e-readers, smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices, challenging news organisations to revise the way they publish news in print.

Job opportunities in journalism are changing too. They tend to be in specialised areas within the industry and to be filled by promotion from within. 

Getting a foot in the door doing just about anything, from answering phones to research assistant, then showing initiative and making a good impression is one way people traditionally made it into this career area.
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Ferry House, 48 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2
(01) 613 7040
45 Upper Mount Street, Dublin 2
(01) 661 1660
2 - 5 Warrington Place, Dublin 2
(01) 644 1200
23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2
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Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
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91 Berwick Street, London W1F 0BP
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MovieExtras.ie, The Courtyard, Ardmore Studios, Bray, Co Wicklow
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Independent House, 27 – 32 Talbot Street, Dublin 1
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Irish Equity, Liberty Hall, Dublin, 1.
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Irish Times Building, PO BOX 74, 24-28, Tara Street, Dublin, 2.
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European Office, Redoubt House, 1 Edward Road, Eastbourne, BN23 8AS, UK
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SOLAS Head Office, 27-33 Upper Baggot St., Dublin 4
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TG4, Baile na hAbhann, Co. Galway
(091) 505 050
Fitzwilliam Business Centre, 26 Upr Pembroke Street, Dublin 2
(01) 637 3950
City Quarter, Lapps Quay, Cork.
(021) 427 2722
Marketing House, South County Business Park, Leopardstown, Dublin, 18.
(01) 295 2355
TV3
TV3, Westgate Business Park, Ballymount, Dublin 24
(01) 419 3333

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