Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Padraig Parle from Department of Education and Skills to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Padraig Parle

Teacher - Special Needs

Department of Education and Skills

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  Padraig Parle
It is essential to be a very patient and organised person. Also you must have a sense of humour, be easy going and not take yourself too seriously.
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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Earth Science & Environment

Are you concerned about the future of the Earth? How is global climate changing?  How and where should we dispose of industrial waste? Are you curious as to how society's growing demands for energy and water can be satisfied, while conserving natural resources for future generations? 

If these are the kind of issues that interest you, then a future career in the area of Earth Science and the Environment might just be for you. 

Over the past decade, heightened public awareness of environmental issues, together with EU legislation have led to growth in environmental careers, particularly in the areas of waste and energy management, and sustainable development.

Ireland is legally obliged by the EU to ensure that by 2020, at least 16% of all energy consumed in the state is from renewable sources, with a sub-target of 10% in the transport sector.

The current Government policy document 'Strategy for Renewable Energy 2012-2020' acknowledges renewable energy, smart grid development, and energy efficiency products and services as key sub-sectors of the green economy going forward, ensuring ongoing career opportunities in this sector.


Earth Science header image

Earth Science is the study of the Earth and its neighbours in space. It is an exciting science with many interesting and practical applications. Some Earth scientists use their knowledge of the Earth to locate and develop energy and mineral resources. Others study the impact of human activity on Earth's environment and design methods to protect the planet. Some use their knowledge about Earth processes such as volcanoes, earthquakes and hurricanes to plan communities that will not expose people to these dangerous events. 

Earth Scientists play a central role in the race to understand how dynamic Earth systems are changing and what we might be able to do about such change. Earth Scientists also play a crucial role in our search for sustainable use and management of natural resources.

The Four Earth Sciences
Many different sciences are used to learn about the earth:

Geology: Science of the Earth
Geology is the primary Earth science. The word means "study of the Earth". Geology deals with the composition of Earth materials, Earth structures, and Earth processes. It is also concerned with the organisms of the planet and how the planet has changed over time. Geologists search for fuels and minerals, study natural hazards, and work to protect Earth's environment. 

Meteorology: Science of the Atmosphere
Meteorology is the study of the atmosphere and how processes in the atmosphere determine Earth's weather and climate. Meteorology is a very practical science because everyone is concerned about the weather. How climate changes over time in response to the actions of people is a topic of urgent worldwide concern. The study of meteorology is of critical concern for protecting Earth's environment. 

Oceanography: Science of the Oceans
Oceanography is the study of Earth's oceans - their composition, movement, organisms and processes. The oceans cover most of our planet and are important resources for food and other commodities. They are increasingly being used as an energy source. The oceans also have a major influence on the weather and changes in the oceans can drive or moderate climate change. Oceanographers work to develop the ocean as a resource and protect it from human impact. The goal is to utilize the oceans while minimizing the effects of our actions.

Astronomy: Science of the Universe
Astronomy is the study of the universe. Here are some examples of why studying space beyond Earth is important: the moon drives the ocean's tidal system, asteroid impacts have repeatedly devastated Earth's inhabitants and energy from the sun drives our weather and climates. A knowledge of astronomy is essential to understanding the Earth. Astronomers can also use a knowledge of Earth materials, processes and history to understand other planets - even those outside of our own solar system.

People who work the 'Life Sciences' - the earth, science and environment sector, also gather and interpret data about the earth and its environment, as well as about other planets in the solar system. They use their knowledge to increase our understanding of how the Earth functions, in order to improve the quality of human life. This work is often divided between time spent in the field, in the laboratory, and in the office. 

Examples of the work that scientists are engaged with in this sector include:

  • Developing natural resources such as wind, wave and solar energy in ways that safeguard the environment.
  • Predicting the behaviour of Earth systems and the universe.
  • Finding adequate supplies of natural resources, such as ground water, petroleum, and metals.
  • Conserving soils and maintaining agricultural productivity.
  • Maintaining quality of water supplies.
  • Reducing human suffering and property loss from natural hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, floods, landslides, hurricanes, and tsunamis.
  • Determining geological controls on natural environments and habitats and predicting the impact of human activities on them.
  • Defining the balance between society's demand for natural resources and the need to sustain healthy ecosystems.
  • Understanding and communicating global climate patterns.
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Environment header image

Environmental Science is the study of the myriad interactions between humans and the world around them, living and non-living. As Earth’s human population continues to grow, as technology advances and human needs and wants increase, our impacts on the world become more widespread and severe, despite improvement in some areas. Environmental impacts, in turn, affect human health and well-being.

 A few of the major challenges that are topics for environmental science include:

  • Global Climate Change (global warming, its causes and all of its consequences)
  • Management of Earth's water resources
  • Energy and mineral resource depletion
  • Meeting the food, fibre and clothing needs of a growing World population
  • Air pollution and acid deposition (rain)
  • Water pollution
  • The loss of fisheries
  • The spread of infectious diseases, including those caused by organisms that have developed antibiotic resistance
  • Long term sustainability of the Global and national economies
  • The fate of hazardous chemicals in the environment
  • Potential environmental effects of genetic engineering

All of the above and other environmental challenges are multidisciplinary in nature.  That is, in order to understand each environmental challenge sufficiently well to develop viable solutions, scientists must assemble expertise in several disciplines.  It is true that no single scientist will be an expert in all of the facets of the several disciplines needed to address any one problem in detail, but it is also important that environmental scientists, decision makers and other workers in the field understand the different sciences sufficiently well to communicate with those of other specialties and to appreciate the importance of other disciplines in addressing challenges.

At a minimum, the well trained environmental scientist will be conversant in physics, chemistry, biology, ecology and geology.  The environmental scientist will also be familiar with the relevant economic, social and political science, because all three are essential to understanding not only how humans come to affect the environment, but also what options are available for action, because technical fixes will rarely, if ever, solve an environmental problem once and for all.  Politics, economics and cultural adjustment will each contribute its share to any viable solution.

Clean Technology

The world's population is continuing to increase at a rapid pace, increasing the pressure being put on the planet. The growing demands for energy and commodities consumption requires new technologies to mitigate these challenges and 'clean technology' is one of these responses.

Renewable energy is perhaps the key development under the 'cleantech' umbrella, but the concept more than solar panels and biofuels - it is a widely diverse segment of technology. Clean Tech includes products and services that improve productivity or efficiency while also reducing costs, inputs, energy consumption, waste, or pollution. Clean Tech includes everything from energy efficiency and recycling efforts, to pollution controls.

IDA Ireland reports Ireland has become a major hub for investment in the rapidly developing Clean Technology sector. Leading Clean Technology companies have located here because of the enormous potential of natural resources, a strong Government commitment to Renewable Energy development and deployment and internationally proven relevant expertise. The sector is backed by a high level of relevant skills and experience, a thriving RD&I environment and supportive government policies.

Renewable Energy

Renewable, or green energy is a fast-growing area in Ireland requiring new skills and expertise. Renewable energy includes Biofuels, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydro, Marine, Solar and Wind Energy. 

VideoA Day in the Life of a Wind Farm and its Caretakers

Rapid growth in the renewable and green energy sector in Ireland has led to an explosion in the number of training schemes available, as there is a growing demand for a properly trained 'green' workforce. The main courses out there centre around:

BER - Building Energy Rating
Since 1st January 2009, a BER certificate is compulsory for all homes being either sold or rented. Homes are rated on a scale of A - G to see how energy efficient they are. A BER is calculated by considering components of the residence including the roof, door and window sizes and examining how it has been constructed. BER assessments can only be carried out by a Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) registered assessor. To gain this accreditation, you have to complete a BER course and register with SEI.          
To search for related courses: click here


Air Pressure Testing
Since July 2008, air pressure / air tightness tests are legally required for all new homes. Air pressure testing is a valuable exercise for any home as it leads to a reduction in draughts and heat loss, thus increasing energy efficiency. The measurement of air tightness also represents an important factor in fire safety as the development of an air-tight barrier blocks oxygen which is obviously a feeding agent for fire. 

Air pressure testing is carried out in a large number of commercial buildings in order to maximise the efficiency of air conditioning units. Air pressure courses will train you how to carry out a proper assessment and use the required equipment.
To search for related courses: click here

Thermal Imaging
Thermal testing or thermography measures variations in temperature and the amount of radiation released by an object. Thermal testing is used for a wide range of uses including firefighting, monitoring heat loss, veterinary treatment and manufacturing.

Thermography courses train people to be able to use an infrared camera in order to determine the amount of heat radiation coming from an object. The heat radiation will show up on the camera as different colours, according to its source.

Thermal imaging courses train people to identify areas of heat and become familiar with the electromagnetic spectrum and how to use thermal imaging cameras.
To search for related courses: click here

Renewable Installer Training
The rapid pace of growth in the renewable industry has meant that new technologies are constantly being added. Training is needed in order to become fully competent in the installation and service of all equipment used in renewable technologies, for example solar panels and wind turbines.
To search for related courses: click here

Insulation Installer Training
Insulation is vital for reducing the carbon footprint of buildings and can provide an effective way to reduce fuel bills, which is particularly relevant for these testing economic times that we currently find ourselves in. The demand for insulation is steadily growing and represents an important area of job creation.

Insulation installer training courses provide participants with an introduction to insulation materials and train them to become fully versed in building regulations and the correct way to carry out an insulation assessment for a building. The courses also outline the key requirements for insulating various types of buildings.
To search for related courses: click here

The global clean tech market is estimated at 3.5 trillion Euro with the potential to grow by more than 4% per year up to 2015, and the creation of an additional 10,000 jobs across the sector.

The range of employers who recruit in this area is large and includes:

  • Voluntary sector (e.g. conservation charities, pressure groups)
  • Public sector (e.g. regulatory bodies, such as local authorities, the Environmental Protection Agency, research institutes, education establishments)
  • Private sector (e.g. industry - including the ESB, Bord Gáis and Bord na Móna, along with those involved in resource management, such as the water and forestry industries, environmental consultants)

People can be employed in a wide variety of activities in the sector ranging from site identification, ecology, archaeology, aviation, civil and project management, grid connection, electrical installation and forestry services to name but a few.

People who work the 'Life Sciences' - the earth, science and environment sector, also gather and interpret data about the earth and its environment, as well as about other planets in the solar system. They use their knowledge to increase our understanding of how the Earth functions, in order to improve the quality of human life. This work is often divided between time spent in the field, in the laboratory, and in the office. 

Examples of the work that scientists are engaged with in this sector include:

  • Developing natural resources such as wind, wave and solar energy in ways that safeguard the environment.
  • Predicting the behaviour of Earth systems and the universe.
  • Finding adequate supplies of natural resources, such as ground water, petroleum, and metals.
  • Conserving soils and maintaining agricultural productivity.
  • Maintaining quality of water supplies.
  • Reducing human suffering and property loss from natural hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, floods, landslides, hurricanes, and tsunamis.
  • Determining geological controls on natural environments and habitats and predicting the impact of human activities on them.
  • Defining the balance between society's demand for natural resources and the need to sustain healthy ecosystems.
  • Understanding and communicating global climate patterns.
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Full Address
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The National Trust for Ireland, Tailors' Hall, Back Lane, Dublin, 8.
(01) 454 1786
Main St., Newbridge, Co. Kildare.
(045) 439 001
The Exchange, Belgard Square North, Tallaght, Dublin, 24.
(01) 400 0800
29 – 31 Adelaide Road, Dublin, 2.
(01) 678 2554
The Custom's House, Dublin, 1.
(01) 888 2000
17, St. Andrew's Street, Dublin, 2.
1890 200 191
22, Clyde Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin, 4.
(01) 665 1300
Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow.
(01) 276 1211
Johnstown Castle Estate, Wexford, Co. Wexford.
(053) 916 0600
6 rue des Frères Lumière 68200 Mulhouse France
(+33) 389 329440
Sycamore House, Millennium Park, Osberstown, Naas, Co. Kildare.
(045) 899 341
Meterological Office, Glasnevin Hill, Dublin, 9
(01) 806 4200
UCD, Belfield, Dublin, 4.
(01) 716 2243

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