Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jason Ruane from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Jason Ruane

Computer Programmer

Intel

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  Jason Ruane

Possibly useful qualities/interests:

A predisposition towards technical problems, such as puzzles or machinery. An interest in the nature of how things work, such as the desire to disassemble machinery/gadgetry to unlock its inner workings.

An inventive side; one who uses the parts of other gadgets, to make a new personalised gadget. Interested in high tech gear: gadgetry of all forms.

A capacity to learn processes for oneself e.g. seeing a puzzle solved and then repeating it.

Skills: Technical subjects such as Maths or electronics. Programming is very accessible to anyone with a basic home PC and some internet connection so try it out and see if you like it.

Values: If you value the solving of an intricate, convoluted problem, for it's own sake and find that rewarding, then any engineering job will come easily.

Education: Firm basis in Maths and the sciences. People are hired into engineering positions here from backgrounds such as science and computing primarily.

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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Study Skills - 12 Things you need to know

First Things First
Use Time Wisely
Get Organised
Learn How To Read
Schedule Your Time
Listen And Take Notes
Hand In Neat Work
Ask Questions
Help Other People
Anticipate Exam Questions
Do More Than You Are Asked
Use What You Learn




 

 
1 - First Things First (5:06)

Video Courtsey YouTube

 
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We have several worksheets to support the use of the Study Skills test for secondary school students. Click on the links below to download these sheets in Adobe PDF format.
Learning Skills Workbook
Worksheets:
Place of Study
Organisation
Motivation and Goal Setting
Reading Skills
Note Taking Skills
Revising and Exam Preparation
Examination Performance

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