Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jacinta Shinnick from Irish Tax Institute to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Jacinta Shinnick

AITI Chartered Tax Adviser

Irish Tax Institute

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  Jacinta Shinnick
Having an interest in research, a questioning mind and good analytical skills definitely contribute toward someone being a good fit for Registered Tax Consultant. An interest in business (even if it doesn't stretch as far as poring over every column inch of the Financial Times on a daily basis) will also help drive your understanding of the issues you come across in work.

While numerical skills, problem solving and related abilities are of central importance in finding the answers to the questions you review at work, it's often overlooked that, to be really good at this job, you also have to have the ability to get the information across to your client (or your manager, or Revenue, etc). The ability to communicate in a clear, logical, uncluttered way in writing as well as face-to-face will make you a great fit for the job.
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Creative?
Creative 
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Job Seekers

Job seekers fall into many categories. You may be entering the world of work for the first time; you may have many years of work experience under your belt; you may be one of thousands of people that have been made redundant or lost their job in the economic downturn; you may want to change career direction, or may simply be looking for a better job - all are reasons that prompt people to look at the labour market for job opportunities.

In the current climate, finding the right job can be a challenging, exciting or even daunting process, whatever your reason. A range of resources are available to you through CareersPortal.ie, that are designed to assist you in making sound, informed decisions about your career.

Use the links on this page to find the resources you need.

Self-assessment exercises: CareersPortal Career File

The Interest Profiler is a really useful assessment exercise. Completing the exercise will highlight what occupations would be most suited to you. It takes about 15 - 20 mins to complete and will generate an eight page career interest report for you.

How do I complete the Interest Profiler?

To complete your personal Interest Profiler, start by signing up to CareersPortal.ie and creating your on-line career file. This file can then be accessed from any machine anywhere. It will allow you to save up to 10 documents (e.g. CV, Cover Letter etc.), and complete a Personality Assessment in relation to what careers will suit you. You can also save Occupations of interest to you, details of related PLC and CAO courses that you think you'd enjoy and give you access to an array of useful information on study and career skills.

 To create your on-line file just click on the image below.

 

 



  Hint: Hewlett-Packard
I was working as an engineer for a few years, but wanted to do more. I chose to go back to collage and completed an MBA in 2003. In 2004 an opportunity in Marketing on site became available and I got the job!  At the time, nobody on site believed that there was a future in marketing (except the Senior management) so I was one of the only applicants for the role. Now, I get other engineers asking every week, How to get into Marketing. Sometimes you need to take a little risk in your career.
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