Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Anne Nutley from Bank of Ireland to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Anne Nutley

Contact Centre Agent

Bank of Ireland

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  Anne Nutley

Anyone considering this job would need to be patient, warm, a good listener and customer focused. However in the long run what you need most of all is common sense.

 

If you are considering returning to the work force don't sell yourself short. Remember all the life experience you have acquired rearing a family and running a household.

 

Believe in yourself and go for it!

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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Job Seekers

Job seekers fall into many categories:

  • You may be entering the world of work for the first time
  • You may have many years of work experience under your belt
  • You may be one of thousands of people that have been made redundant or lost their job in the economic downturn or
  • You may want to change career direction, or be simply be looking for a better job

These all are reasons that prompt people to look at the labour market for job opportunities. In the current climate, finding the right job can be a challenging, exciting or even a daunting process, whatever your reason, a range of resources are available to you through CareersPortal.ie, that are designed to assist you in making sound, informed decisions about your career.

Note: Use the links on this page to find the resources you need.

Self-assessment exercises: CareersPortal Career File

The Interest Profiler is a really useful assessment exercise. Completing the exercise will highlight what occupations would be most suited to you. It takes about 15 minutes to complete and will generate an eight page career interest report that is unique for you.

How do I complete the Interest Profiler?

To complete your personal Interest Profiler, start by signing up to CareersPortal.ie and creating your on-line career file. This file can then be accessed from any machine anywhere. It will allow you to save up to 10 documents (e.g. CV, Cover Letter etc.) and complete a Personality Assessment in relation to what careers might suit you. You can also save Occupations of interest to you, details of related PLC and CAO courses that you think you would enjoy and also provides you with access to an array of useful information on study and career skills.

 To create your on-line file just click on the image below.

 

 



  Hint: Department of Education and Skills
When I started looking for a job I subscribed to a UK-based weekly list of academic jobs. As lecturers tend to work in specialised areas I did anticipate that I would have to work abroad for a number of years, to gain experience and wait for a job to become available in Ireland.

Fortunately, I was nearing completion of my doctorate as DCU Business School entered into significant expansion. I heard about my job through a number of sources - it was advertised both in the Irish Times and on the DCU website.

At that point I was getting the Times every week, as were my parents. I was also told about by a fellow PhD student in Trinity, who was also working in DCU. I applied by filling in an application form, which was available on the web. I was given the opportunity to include additional pertinent information, so I sent in an extra document to accompany the form.

In this I emphasised the fact that my research interests were complementary to those of members of the HRM/Organisational Psychology group, as well as to those of the Learning, Innovation and Knowledge Research Center. I was also excited at the prospect of joining the Business School as it entered a dynamic expansion phase.

The selection process had two components, which were a few days apart. First I had to come in and make a presentation. This was to assess my teaching and communication skills. There was a panel with the Head and Professor of the Human Resource Management and Organisational Psychology Group, which I was applying to join; the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning; an external representative; and a representative from the Human Resource Department.

In the next stage, I had an interview with what seemed a big panel at the time. The Dean of the Business School, the Professor of HRM, the Head of the HRM and Organisational Psychology group, two external Professors and a representative of the HR group asked me questions about why I wanted to work in DCU; my teaching and research experience and philosophy; course design and delivery.

The panel made an obvious effort to make me feel comfortable, but I was still pretty nervous - I really wanted to work here!

I was contacted by telephone two weeks later and was told that they would like to offer me the job. The offer was quickly followed by a formal letter and contract.

The decision to take the job was easy. I had also applied for and been offered two other jobs - one in Ireland and one in the UK. But DCU had a very clear fit with my research interests, I was very impressed by their strategy and I'd really enjoyed meeting my potential colleagues through the interview process. I had really enjoyed being in college in Trinity so moving into a similarly welcoming and collegiate culture was very important to me.

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