Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Rose Griffin from ESB to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Rose Griffin

Network Technician

ESB

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  Rose Griffin
Well in school you should try do a practical subject and get used to working with your hands. Physics is another subject that would be of benefit. It would help in the theory exams that you complete after each of the off the job training modules.
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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Unemployed - What Next?

The information below provides an overview of some frequently asked questions in relation to applying to the Department of Social Protection for social welfare entitlements when you are unemployed.

What do I do when I become unemployed?

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How do I qualify for Jobseeker's Benefit payment?

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Made Redundant - Will the amount of my redundancy payment affect my rate of benefit?

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How much will I get paid on Jobseeker's?

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What happens if I don’t have enough PRSI contributions paid to qualify for Jobseeker’s Benefit?

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How often will I have to sign on for my unemployment payment?

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Will I be entitled to any other supports now that I am unemployed?

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Is the procedure the same if I am only reducing my hours worked?

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Who pays for Bank Holidays when I am working reduced hours?

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I am self-employed but my income and work has drastically reduced in the past six months. Can I claim Jobseeker’s Allowance?

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I need more information for my particular situation. Where can I get it?

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ask the experts
  Hint: Teagasc

When I came out of the Botanic Gardens, I went to work in Holland for the summer and when I came back, I joined a Landscaping firm. This was in the early 1979/80 when the economy was not as buoyant as it is now. We were working on dusty sites, doing landscaping and lawns.

When the weather got bad, you were let go and got a pound an hour "wet time". I remember standing in out of very heavy rain one day in an industrial unit, reading the paper. I saw a job for a Sales Rep to sell horticultural machinery, chainsaws, lawnmowers, golf course equipment etc. I applied for and got the job as an indoors Sales Rep.

It was a great learning curve, I got training in sales, and I was selling equipment related to the industry I was in. That was one of the reasons I got the job as a result of my background in horticulture. That was great training, and I really enjoyed it. I was getting on very well with that job, but when the weather was good (around March/April) I really missed being out in the fresh air.

Within a short period of time it turned out that the company ran into bad financial difficulties, and they let about eight people go and as I was one of the last in, I was also let go. This turned out to be a blessing in disguise because it gave me the impetus to set up on my own.

I went out and started working for myself then. It was a big decision for me. I was lucky to get onto a Start your Own Business course, run by the Irish Productivity Centre and FAS. The course was excellent, it ran over sixteen weeks - eight weeks of lectures and practicals, and the second eight was about getting it off the ground.

It was great doing that, and I had a job I used to do on a Saturday. I managed to get another contract for a couple of days a week shortly afterwards, and I just built it up from there. That's really how my own Landscaping Business got off the ground.


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