Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Richard Storey from McDonald's to give some advice for people considering this job:


Richard Storey

Shift Manager


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  Richard Storey

The initial couple of days can be tough as you are in training and it can make people rethink about working here, but I would have to say persevere, as there are rewards at the end of the tunnel.

McDonald's put their people first and never leave them doing the same job all the time. To work in McDonald's you requires patience, a good personality with a willingness to learn something new everyday.

Showing an interest in other peoples interests would help as you have to work as a team so interpersonal skills are ESSENTIAL!!


Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Sources of Help

A wide range of information sources and supports are available to you when you are looking for a job in Ireland.

Organisations such as INTREO, the Local Employment Services (LES), INOU and Jobcare among others, provide a wide range of useful information and services including:

  • Information on entitlements
  • How to develop key skills required for the current labour market
  • Expert assistance and advice on employment, training and upskilling opportunities and
  • Practical supports such as CV and interview preparation

Just be mindful that each organisation provides it's own key supports.

Follow the links [Left] for further information.

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ask the experts
  Hint: Department of Education and Skills
When I started looking for a job I subscribed to a UK-based weekly list of academic jobs. As lecturers tend to work in specialised areas I did anticipate that I would have to work abroad for a number of years, to gain experience and wait for a job to become available in Ireland.

Fortunately, I was nearing completion of my doctorate as DCU Business School entered into significant expansion. I heard about my job through a number of sources - it was advertised both in the Irish Times and on the DCU website.

At that point I was getting the Times every week, as were my parents. I was also told about by a fellow PhD student in Trinity, who was also working in DCU. I applied by filling in an application form, which was available on the web. I was given the opportunity to include additional pertinent information, so I sent in an extra document to accompany the form.

In this I emphasised the fact that my research interests were complementary to those of members of the HRM/Organisational Psychology group, as well as to those of the Learning, Innovation and Knowledge Research Center. I was also excited at the prospect of joining the Business School as it entered a dynamic expansion phase.

The selection process had two components, which were a few days apart. First I had to come in and make a presentation. This was to assess my teaching and communication skills. There was a panel with the Head and Professor of the Human Resource Management and Organisational Psychology Group, which I was applying to join; the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning; an external representative; and a representative from the Human Resource Department.

In the next stage, I had an interview with what seemed a big panel at the time. The Dean of the Business School, the Professor of HRM, the Head of the HRM and Organisational Psychology group, two external Professors and a representative of the HR group asked me questions about why I wanted to work in DCU; my teaching and research experience and philosophy; course design and delivery.

The panel made an obvious effort to make me feel comfortable, but I was still pretty nervous - I really wanted to work here!

I was contacted by telephone two weeks later and was told that they would like to offer me the job. The offer was quickly followed by a formal letter and contract.

The decision to take the job was easy. I had also applied for and been offered two other jobs - one in Ireland and one in the UK. But DCU had a very clear fit with my research interests, I was very impressed by their strategy and I'd really enjoyed meeting my potential colleagues through the interview process. I had really enjoyed being in college in Trinity so moving into a similarly welcoming and collegiate culture was very important to me.

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