Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked John Harding from ESB to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

John Harding

Mechanical Engineer

ESB

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  John Harding
To be an engineer, a person must firstly have a degree. Having an interest in what you are working at is always half the battle. Being technically minded is also a great benefit.
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Naturalist?
Naturalist 
Not surprisingly, some aspect of the natural sciences will run through the Naturalists interests - from ecological awareness to nutrition and health. People with an interest in horticulture, land usage and farming (including fish) are Naturalists.

Some Naturalists focus on animals rather than plants, and may enjoy working with, training, caring for, or simply herding them. Other Naturalists will prefer working with the end result of nature's produce - the food produced from plants and animals. Naturalists like solving problems with solutions that show some sensitivity to the environmental impact of what they do. They like to see practical results, and prefer action to talking and discussing.
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Engineering Occupations

Key points for selected engineering occupations

  • In 2013, there were approximately 24,000 persons employed in the selected engineering occupations, representing 1.2% of Ireland's workforce
  • Just over half of overall employment in the selected occupations was concentrated in manufacturing (mostly machinery/equipment and pharmaceuticals), while almost an additional one fifth was concentrated in professional, scientific and technical activities (mostly architectural & engineering activities, technical testing and analysis)
  • Almost 60% of total employment in the selected engineering occupations was at professional level (i.e. engineers); the remainder was at technician level
  • Of the 17 occupational groups examined in this report, engineering occupations recorded the strongest employment growth between 2008 and 2013 (expanding by 6.8% on average annually); the strongest employment growth was observed for production, design & QC engineers (11.9% on average annually) and process, production & quality assurance technicians (9.4% on average annually)
  • Between 2008 and 2013, employment increased by 6,500; the largest absolute increase was for production, design & QC engineers (2,600)
  • Over the period 2012 to 2013, overall employment in the selected engineering occupations contracted by 8.8%
  • Over four fifths of those employed in each occupation was aged 25-54
  • Just over 90% of engineering professionals and 70% of technicians in employment were third level graduates
  • The majority of employed engineering professionals and technicians were male, worked full-time and were Irish-nationals
  • The unemployment rate for both engineering professionals and technicians was considerably below the national average rate of 11.7%.

Shortage Indicators

During 2013, newly advertised vacancies were numerous for engineering skills at professional and technician levels.
Moreover, difficult to fill posts requiring engineering skills have been identified in the areas of
  • production and process engineering (automation (e.g. computer numerical control, computer aided design and manufacturing, programmable logic control (PLC)), process safety and system control)
  • quality and validation (e.g. Computer Validation Systems (CVS))
  • product development and design (in the areas of chemicals, biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, ICT, food and medical devices)
  • precision engineering (tool making and design for automotive, pharmaceutical and medical devices sectors)
  • energy (power generation and transmission)
  • telecommunications (mobile telephony)
  • project management and production planning.
Given this shortage, many companies are sourcing engineering skills from abroad: over 150 employment permits were issued to non- EEA engineers in 2013.

Employment opportunities are expected to increase as per recent job creation announcements for engineers and engineering technicians in manufacturing (e.g. Aspen Pharma, BioMarin, Ethicon Biosurgery Ireland, Jazz Pharmaceuticals etc.), ICT (e.g. Intel) and energy (e.g. ENERCON, capSpire, Sure Power Energy etc.).

The Government's investment through Science Foundation Ireland and the establishment of the Irish Photonic Integration Centre in UCC will add to the demand for engineering skills and support growth in high technology sectors.


Labour Market Research 14

These links are to well established sources of information used to review, evaluate and predict changes in our labour market.

Regional Labour Markets Bulletin 2014 
Report prepared by the Skills and Labour Market
Research Unit in SOLAS aimed at providing an analysis of the key labour market indicators for each of Ireland’s eight administrative
regions: Border, Dublin, Mid-East, Midland, Mid-West, South-East, South-
Assessing the Demand for Big Data and Analytics Skills 2013 - 2020 
May 2014 EGFSN report identifying measures to build up the Big Data and analytics talent pool in Ireland over the period up to 2020 in line with enterprise demand.
EGFSN - Report for HE Providers on Springboard 2014 / ICT Level 8 Conversion Programme 
February 2014 Report "Guidance for Higher Education providers on current and future skills needs of enterprise - Springboard 2014 / ICT Level 8 Conversion Programme"
Addressing Future Demand for High-level ICT Skills (EGFSN) 
Study forecasting the demand for high-level ICT skills to 2018, across all sectors of the economy in Ireland.
The Green Economy in Ireland (EGFSN) 
This study identifies the future skills needs of enterprise engaged within the green economy in Ireland and proposes a range of measures to ensure that their future skills base will drive business and employment growth. The study informs education and tra
National Skills Bulletin 2013 
Current National Skills Bulletin, providing a detailed overview of the Irish labour market. It is based on research conducted by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit of FÁS (Now SOLAS)on behalf of the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs.
CSO - Central Statistics Office 
This is the primary source of statistical information about our population. Several of the reports generated by the CSO provide the basis of most other reports on the Labour Market.
Skills and Labour Market Reports 
A list of current Publications directly related to Labour Market conditions produced jointly by SOLAS (formerly FAS) and the EGFSN
Forfás - Ireland's national policy and advisory board for enterprise, trade, science, technology and innovation 
Forfás provides the Department of Jobs, Enterprise & Innovation (formerly Enterprise, Trade and Employment - DETE) and other stakeholders with analysis, advice and support on issues related to enterprise, trade, science, technology and innovation.
EGFSN - Expert Group on Future Skills Needs 
The Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) is a body appointed by the Irish Government to advise it on aspects of education and training related to the future skills requirements of the enterprise sector of the Irish economy.
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Current Labour Market related info  3

These sites provide news of current events that relate to our evolving labour market.

IBEC Quarterly Economic Trends 
Download publication in PDF format.
SCSI Employment Opportunities & Skills Requirements for Construction and Property Surveying 2014-18 
New report April 2014 from SCSI outlining the Employment Opportunities and Skills Requirements for Construction and Property Surveying projected from 2014-2018
Irish Independant News - Labour Market 
Current news relating to the Irish Labour market.


Know of a link that you think should be included in this section? Send it to info@careersportal.ie