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UCD Graduate Testimonials: Agriculture, Food & Nutrition

UCD Graduate Testimonials: Agriculture, Food & Nutrition

Read what UCD Graduates have to say about their experiences ...

Agri-Environmental Sciences:

“I have a passion for the environment, particularly how agriculture can interact with it in various positive and negative ways. This is what attracted me to the Agri-Environmental Sciences course at UCD. The course has an excellent mix of subjects that have been very beneficial and have provided me with a broad understanding of Agri-Environmental Sciences and its associated disciplines. The course also involves many field trips, which provides valuable practical experience. For Professional Work Experience, I worked on a large dairy farm, in the Agri-Environmental Structures Division of The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and I worked in the Teagasc Advisory Offices in Dundalk. The experience is very broad and has shown me the real world applications of both the agricultural and environmental aspects of the course.”
Leo McGrane, Graduate

Agricultural Systems Technology


I had always had an interest in farming, having grown up in the Irish countryside with a suckler beef farm at home, and my grades in Maths and Design and Communication Graphics meant that out of the majors available to me within Agriculture and Food Science, Engineering Technology was the most appealing.

I would recommend this programme area to any student who has an in interest in the natural environment and the way things work.  Being able to look at a problem and see a solution is a large part of the final year project and an invaluable skill for anyone seeking to explore a future in almost any industry in today’s changing climate but no more so than in Agriculture and Engineering.
Orla Farrell, Graduate, Engineering Technology (now Agricultural Systems Technology) 


Animal & Crop Production


“Agricultural Science in UCD was definitely the rigth course for me. I started as an Omnibus entrant and chose to study Animal and Crop Production in first year. Agricultural Science provides the ideal combination of theory and practical knowledge. We learn about a variety of topics over the course of our four years such as reproduction, nutrition and business to name a few.

The Ag Science community is one of a kind. Although there are over 30,000 students here in UCD the Ags are like one big family. It is hard to walk through the Agricultural Science building without stopping to chat to a few classmates along the way. In first year you will have peer mentors to help with any problems and events throughout the year to make new friends.”
Amie Coonan, Graduate

Animal Science


“Having left a previous course in Limerick after seven weeks, after one week in UCD I knew it was for me. Now with four years of Animal Science complete I can without question say I found my calling. The course itself is diverse in a way that you gain both practical and theoretical knowledge ina number of key agricultural areas. Certainly for me the best part of the degree was the Professional Work Experience. Not only did I gain hands on experience on progressive pig, sheep, dairy and beef farms but I also got to work alongside some of Ireland’s industry leaders. Without question the experience I gained here has enhanced my skill set massively going forward for future employment. I couldn’t recommend the Animal Science degree any more highly for prospective students.”
Shane Murphy, Graduate

Animal Science – Equine



I chose to study Animal Science – Equine in UCD, as I knew the degree would offer me the opportunity to combien my love for science with my love for all things equine. Steeped in science from the beginning, it has given me a strong foundation in the basic sciences and degree specific knowledge. I only really knew about the leisure and tourism industry at the beginning of my degree, but I used the Professional Work Experience programme to work within the Thoroughbred industry – gaining valuable knowledge and contacts. I spent the five months as a student researcher and also worked at Ballylinch Stud, which gave me the skills necessary to work within the industry in future. This programme has really opened my eyes and helped me to get to where I am today as a researcher, studying jet-lag in the horse. I would recommed this degree to anyone with a passion for horses and science!”
Shaileen McGovern, Graduate

Dairy Business

“Four years have come and gone since I entered UCD, not knowing what to expect from a relatively new degree, and myself having no direct agricultural background. Dairy Business is a fantastic degree which provides the individual with the knowledge and skills required to succeed in the modern Dairy industry. The semester spent in Moorepark Research Centre in Fermoy Co. Cork was a great opportunity to interact with some of the leading experts in the world wide dairy industry, and to review their work and trials. The opportunity to be mentored by efficient, progressive farmers was another great experience. Returning to UCD in fourth year allowed me to consolidate all the information I had gained from the previous few years and leave me ready to enter the agricultural sector, either at farm or industry level.”
Christopher Cahill, Graduate

Food & Agribusiness Management

“Coming from a beef farming background in East Clare, Food & Agribusiness Management was the right course for me, as I have always had a huge interest in business and marketing and the agri-food industry both in Ireland and internationally. I found the science subjects in first and second year challenging but they were necessary to build the foundation for my final years. The highlight of my course was the opportunity to study abroad and the compulsory Professional Work Experience [PWE]. In my third year, I studied at Purdue University, Indiana, USA for one semester. I then completed 30 weeks PWE, the majority fo which I spent with an animal health company but I also spent time working on a beef and sheep enterprise and with a grain and agricultural merchant.”
Aideen Burke, Graduate

Food Science


“I chose the Food Science programme at UCD as it offered a strong scientific and research-based approach to the diverse field of food production, in which I had long been interested. I have thoroughly enjoyed the coursework to date, which blends project work, laboratory work and group work extremely well. I carried out my five months of professional work experience in the quality assurance department of a dairy production company specialising in UHT products and ice cream. I found this to be a fantastic introduction to the industry and a means to apply the knowledge previously gained from the course, while also gaining knowledge which would prove invaluable in my final year. The food production industry is set to expand significantly in Ireland in the coming years and this course provides the perfect preparation for anyone wishing to enter it.”
Jonathan Magan, Graduate

Forestry


 “I come from a farm forestry background and have been interested in the Irish forestry industry from a young age. The forestry degree covers a broad range of science and forestry based modules for careers in forestry research, forest planning, forest management, and beyond. Professional work experience is a fantastic opportunity to gain practical hands on experience in the forest sector. My PWE provided me an opportunity to work with Coillte Teoranta here in Ireland and with the Icelandic Forest Service [skógrækt ríkisins]. The fourth and final year of the forestry degree is very assessment and project based. As part of final year students also carry out a research project, this is an opportunity to pick a research area or aspect that is of interest to you. Students also have the opportunity to visit the Blackforest in Germany; this is a fantastic opportunity to see large scale forest plantations, mills and harvesting operations.”
Mary Clifford, Graduate

Horticulture, Landscape & Sportsturf Management



“Ever wondered why we prune an apple tree, or why trees gain glorious colours in the autumn? Then this programme can provide the answers. The small size of the horticulture class allows you to develop friendships and connections with your peers and lecturers, benefiting both your academic studies and social relations, which contribute to an overall enjoyable university experience. Undoubtedly the most enjoyable and beneficial aspect of the programme was professional work experience. I gained invaluable experience and contacts in the course of my work experience. It provides a valuable insight into the professional working environment and an opportunity to discover where your true passion for horticulture lies.”
Sarah Noonan, Graduate

Human Nutrition



“My choice to study Human Nutrition as a degree stemmed from my love of science as a subject in school and my interest in health, particularly how our diet can influence this. There are countless career paths which you can pursue with a BSc in Human Nutrition. It is a particularly exciting field of study as it is constantly evolving due to continuously emerging research. Nutrition is very topical subject at the moment, with current health epidemics in obesity and its related diseases. One of the best things about this degree is the 10-month work placement. I worked abroad for this as part of a nutrition research team. It was an amazing experience and gave me a clear idea of the type of career I want to pursue on graduating. It is a tight-knit course, but as part of the School of Agriculture and Food Science you are part of a bigger and exciting community within the college.”

Doireann Sheridan, Graduate

 

UCD