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Investigative

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with sophiscticated technology. These types prefer mentally stimulating environments and often pay close attention to developments in their chosen field.

Salary Range
€18k - €23k
Career Zone

In Brief...

Equipment Assemblers work on a production line in a factory putting together electronic equipment by hand.

Knowledge

  • Production and Processing Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Design Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

In Summary - Electronic Equipment Assembler

Career Sectors

Electronic Equipment Assemblers typically work in the following Career Sectors:

Manufacturing
Engineering & Manufacturing
Explore Engineering
Engineering & Manufacturing

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The Work - Electronic Equipment Assembler

Electronics/electrical assemblers work on a wide range of equipment. For example, they may insert microchips into a printed circuit board that will form part of a television set or the control program element of a washing machine. They may wind coils for electrical motors or transformers or insert them with other components into kitchen blenders, hair dryers or windscreen wipers.  
 
Electronics/electrical assemblers usually work in factories. There are two main types of work: mass production or batch production.  
 
In mass production, assemblers usually work on an assembly line, working at the same speed as everyone else in the line.  
 
In batch production, assemblers usually work at a bench. A supervisor gives the assembler a number of components and special instructions, which may include a parts list and a diagram or technical drawing. Assemblers then work to finish the batch within a target time. They may stand up to work on larger products or components.  
 
Depending on the type of equipment being assembled, this work can either be quite simple and repetitive or more complex and time-consuming.

Most commonly reported Work Tasks

  • Read and interpret schematic drawings, diagrams, blueprints, specifications, work orders, or reports to determine materials requirements or assembly instructions.
  • Assemble electrical or electronic systems or support structures and install components, units, subassemblies, wiring, or assembly casings, using rivets, bolts, soldering or micro-welding equipment.
  • Adjust, repair, or replace electrical or electronic component parts to correct defects and to ensure conformance to specifications.
  • Position, align, or adjust workpieces or electrical parts to facilitate wiring or assembly.
  • Explain assembly procedures or techniques to other workers.
  • Clean parts, using cleaning solutions, air hoses, and cloths.
  • Drill or tap holes in specified equipment locations to mount control units or to provide openings for elements, wiring, or instruments.
  • Fabricate or form parts, coils, or structures according to specifications, using drills, calipers, cutters, or saws.
  • Confer with supervisors or engineers to plan or review work activities or to resolve production problems.
  • Inspect or test wiring installations, assemblies, or circuits for resistance factors or for operation and record results.

Most commonly reported Work Activities

  • Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Interests - Electronic Equipment Assembler

This occupation is typically suited for people with the following Career Interests:

Realist

Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.

Administrative

Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their most productive under supervisors who give clear guidelines and while performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.

Qualities

To be an electronics/electrical assembler, you'll need nimble fingers for handling small components and hand tools. You must be able to work quickly, neatly and accurately.  
 
You will need good literacy and number skills to follow wiring diagrams and written instructions.  
 
You must have normal colour vision to work with colour-coded components and wires. You must be willing to work under direction from others.  
 
You should have a liking for electronics and mechanics.

Entry Requirements - Electronic Equipment Assembler

Pay & Salary - Electronic Equipment Assembler

Salary Range (thousands per year)* €18k - €23k

Data Source(s):
CareersPortal

Last Updated: March, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.

Labour Market Updates - Electronic Equipment Assembler

Useful Contacts - Electronic Equipment Assembler

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