Featured Advice
What are your interests?

Investigative?

Investigative

The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with sophiscticated technology. These types prefer mentally stimulating environments and often pay close attention to developments in their chosen field.

Careers Advice

Careers Advice

What advice do you have for school leavers?

School leavers should think about continuing their education at third level, before considering a career in the space sector. The type of course will depend on their area of interest, but typically a science or engineering degree is desirable, most likely to postgraduate level. Several Irish universities offer degrees physics with astronomy or astrophysics, while there are also relevant courses available in aeronautical engineering.

What advice do you have for graduates?

Graduates of any of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines should examine opportunities in any of the current companies involved in the sector. It should be noted that a postgraduate award would also be highly benifical.

Students could also consider specialised courses, e.g. Masters in Space Science at the International Space University; internships at the European Space Agency; SpaceMaster (Joint European Master in Space Science and Technology) etc, to give them specific knowledge of the space sector.

What advice do you have for career changers?

As the sector is so new, and much of the work is very specialised, there may be limited opportunities for career changers. There are requirements for highly specialised engineering and scientific employees specifically in highly specialised technology disciplines related to the space programme development, including electronics, optoelectronics, materials and structures.

Also, there may be opportunities for those with expertise in Management and Legal areas as the sector grows.

What advice do you have for those wishing to go back to work?

There are requirements for highly specialised engineering and scientific employees specifically in highly specialised technology disciplines related to the space programme development, including electronics, optoelectronics, materials and structures.

Most employees in the space sector enter from college, generally having studied engineering or science. For those workers wanting to return to work and enter the Space sector, a space-related specialisation would be advantageous.

Several Irish universities offer degrees in physics with astronomy or astrophysics, while there are also relevant courses available in aeronautical engineering. Those wishing to go back to work could also consider specialised courses, e.g. Masters in Space Science at the International Space University; internships at the European Space Agency; SpaceMaster (Joint European Master in Space Science and Technology) etc, to give them specific knowledge of the space sector.

Nationality is not a determinant in recruitment or selection. The primary determinant is qualification relevant experience and specialism. The sector is highly international focus both in terms of markets and employment