Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Deirdre Kelleghan from Smart Futures to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Deirdre Kelleghan

Amateur Astronomer

Smart Futures

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  Deirdre Kelleghan
Being a self-employed artist is probably the most difficult job really. You need to be highly motivated in the tasks you set for yourself. You need to be able to work on your inspirations and be totally focused on your targets. If your painting does not work first time you need to be able to learn from your experience and use what worked in another piece. Your ability to have confidence in your journey exploring your choice of subjects in paint is important. As regards doing workshops, bringing fun into the entire effort is the most important element to achieve. Your audiences will learn in a more sustainable way and produce drawings to be proud of.
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Creative?
Creative 
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Introducing Apprenticeships

Apprenticeship is the recognised means by which people are trained to become craftspeople in Ireland.

The 27 Traditional Craft Apprenticeships have been designated by SOLAS and fall within the remit of the Statutory Apprenticeship system, which is organised in Ireland by SOLAS in co-operation with the Department of Education and Skills, employers and unions.

Details including entry requirements, training structure, where to find apprenticeship vacancies and a range of related videos, are available through the menu structure on this page.

New/Proposed apprenticeships

In July 2015, 25 additional apprenticeships were approved, towards expanding the apprenticeship scheme offering in Ireland. These new apprenticeships span the areas of: Software Development, Medical Devices, Insurance, Financial Services, Accountancy, Logistics and Hospitality.

Current situation [updated 29 November 2016]

Two of the new apprenticeships have to date been approved, launched and opened for recruitment, bringing to 29 the total number of approved apprenticeship options now available in Ireland. Both are degree-level professional apprenticeships:

Details of all 25 new apprenticeship areas are available through the menus on this page - See New/Proposed Apprenticeships

The remaining 23 options are currently being developed and are awaiting formal sign-off and approval.

A further 30 apprenticeship options are also under consideration from a total of 86 possible schemes identified by the Apprenticeship Council, following the evaluation process. Details of these will be included here when they are formally announced.

Radio Interview - New opportunities for apprenticeship 

Listen to RTE radio interview [7/4/16] with Ross Nicholson, Motor Mechanic; Jessica Tallon, Wood Manufacturing Apprentice; Colm Rafferty, Trainee Toolmaker with the Air Corp and Paul O'Toole, Chief Executive SOLAS HERE